Media Responsibility Public Interest Broadcasting and the judgment in Richard v BBC

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The recent decision in Sir Cliff Richard’s privacy action against the BBC and South Yorkshire Police has excited a good deal of moral and legal debate concerning the legitimate expectations of well-known individuals and the limits of media freedom. This article analyses the decision in the context of existing domestic and European case law concerning the balance between privacy on the one hand and freedom of expression and the public right to receive information on the other. It argues that given the level of intrusion into the claimant’s private life, and the tactics employed by the BBC in gathering and broadcasting the story, the case was probably decided correctly on the facts. However it is argued that the judgment, and its potential impact on the future of case law in this area, may be damaging to media freedom and the public right to receive information; specifically with reference to media reporting of police investigations
Original languageEnglish
Article number4
Pages (from-to)490-505
Number of pages15
JournalEuropean Human Rights Law Review
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2018

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BBC
public interest
broadcasting
right to information
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police
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Media Responsibility Public Interest Broadcasting and the judgment in Richard v BBC. / Foster, Steve.

In: European Human Rights Law Review, No. 5, 4, 01.10.2018, p. 490-505.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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