Maternal stressors, maternal wellbeing and children's wellbeing in the context of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

Julie H. Barlow, C.C. Wright, K.L. Shaw, R. Luqmani, I.J. Wyness

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    23 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the level of maternal stressors associated with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) and to explore the relationship between maternal wellbeing and children's wellbeing in the context of JIA. The sample (n=60) comprised 30 children with JIA and their mothers. Children and mothers completed self-administered questionnaires independently in outpatient clinics. Mothers had a mean age of 37.73 (SD=5.50), 73% were married, all were White/European. Child participants (20 female and 10 male) had a mean age of 11.46 (SD=2.93), 61% had oligoarticular idiopathic arthritis, 26% had polyarticular juvenile arthritis and 13% systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Compared to normative data, mothers were at risk of anxious and depressed mood, respectively. The highest rated stressors concerned the side effects of medication, the child's future and becoming over-protective of the child. There was a robust association between maternal wellbeing and children's physical functioning that was partially mediated by maternal self-efficacy. In contrast, maternal wellbeing appeared to be independent of children's ratings of pain, anxiety, depression and self-esteem. Maternal stress regarding JIA warrants further investigation, particularly in terms of mother's concern about children's physical functioning, the side effects of medication, visibility of the child's condition, and becoming over-protective.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)89-98
    JournalEarly Child Development and Care
    Volume172
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Feb 2002

    Fingerprint

    Juvenile Arthritis
    Mothers
    Self Efficacy
    Ambulatory Care Facilities
    Self Concept
    Arthritis
    Anxiety
    Depression

    Bibliographical note

    The full text of this article is not available from the repository.
    ‘This is an electronic version of an article published in Early Child Development and Care 172(1). Early Child Development and Care is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a713714731

    Keywords

    • juvenile idiopathic arthritis
    • mothers
    • stress
    • psychological wellbeing

    Cite this

    Maternal stressors, maternal wellbeing and children's wellbeing in the context of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. / Barlow, Julie H.; Wright, C.C.; Shaw, K.L.; Luqmani, R.; Wyness, I.J.

    In: Early Child Development and Care, Vol. 172, No. 1, 02.2002, p. 89-98.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Barlow, Julie H. ; Wright, C.C. ; Shaw, K.L. ; Luqmani, R. ; Wyness, I.J. / Maternal stressors, maternal wellbeing and children's wellbeing in the context of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. In: Early Child Development and Care. 2002 ; Vol. 172, No. 1. pp. 89-98.
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