Maternal cognitions, psychopathologic symptoms, and infant temperament as predictors of early infant feeding problems: A longitudinal study

Claire Farrow, Jacqueline Blissett

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    50 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective: The current study examined the contribution of prenatal and postnatal maternal core beliefs, self-esteem, psychopathologic symptoms, and postnatal infant temperament to the prediction of infant feeding difficulties. Method: Ninety-nine women completed questionnaires assessing their core beliefs, psychopathology, and self-esteem during pregnancy and at 6 months postpartum. At 6 months, mothers also rated their infant's temperament and feeding, and were observed feeding their infants. Results: Maternal reports of child feeding difficulties were predicted by higher levels of emotional deprivation and entitlement core beliefs and lower levels of self-sacrifice and enmeshment core beliefs during pregnancy. Postnatal social isolation core beliefs, lower maternal self-esteem, and more difficult infant temperament added significantly to the variance explained by prenatal factors. Maternal core beliefs, self-esteem, psychopathology, and infant temperament failed to significantly predict independent observations of child food refusal. Conclusion: Maternal cognitions are implicated in the development of maternal reports of feeding difficulty.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)128-134
    Number of pages7
    JournalInternational Journal of Eating Disorders
    Volume39
    Issue number2
    Early online date17 Oct 2005
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2006

    Fingerprint

    self-esteem
    infant feeding
    temperament
    Temperament
    longitudinal studies
    cognition
    Cognition
    signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
    Longitudinal Studies
    Mothers
    Self Concept
    pregnancy
    child nutrition
    Psychopathology
    questionnaires
    Pregnancy
    Social Isolation
    prediction
    Postpartum Period
    Food

    Keywords

    • Infants temperament
    • maternal cognitions
    • feeding difficulties

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine (miscellaneous)
    • Psychiatry and Mental health
    • Food Science
    • Psychology(all)
    • Clinical Psychology

    Cite this

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    abstract = "Objective: The current study examined the contribution of prenatal and postnatal maternal core beliefs, self-esteem, psychopathologic symptoms, and postnatal infant temperament to the prediction of infant feeding difficulties. Method: Ninety-nine women completed questionnaires assessing their core beliefs, psychopathology, and self-esteem during pregnancy and at 6 months postpartum. At 6 months, mothers also rated their infant's temperament and feeding, and were observed feeding their infants. Results: Maternal reports of child feeding difficulties were predicted by higher levels of emotional deprivation and entitlement core beliefs and lower levels of self-sacrifice and enmeshment core beliefs during pregnancy. Postnatal social isolation core beliefs, lower maternal self-esteem, and more difficult infant temperament added significantly to the variance explained by prenatal factors. Maternal core beliefs, self-esteem, psychopathology, and infant temperament failed to significantly predict independent observations of child food refusal. Conclusion: Maternal cognitions are implicated in the development of maternal reports of feeding difficulty.",
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    AB - Objective: The current study examined the contribution of prenatal and postnatal maternal core beliefs, self-esteem, psychopathologic symptoms, and postnatal infant temperament to the prediction of infant feeding difficulties. Method: Ninety-nine women completed questionnaires assessing their core beliefs, psychopathology, and self-esteem during pregnancy and at 6 months postpartum. At 6 months, mothers also rated their infant's temperament and feeding, and were observed feeding their infants. Results: Maternal reports of child feeding difficulties were predicted by higher levels of emotional deprivation and entitlement core beliefs and lower levels of self-sacrifice and enmeshment core beliefs during pregnancy. Postnatal social isolation core beliefs, lower maternal self-esteem, and more difficult infant temperament added significantly to the variance explained by prenatal factors. Maternal core beliefs, self-esteem, psychopathology, and infant temperament failed to significantly predict independent observations of child food refusal. Conclusion: Maternal cognitions are implicated in the development of maternal reports of feeding difficulty.

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