Mapping the Audit Traces of Interdisciplinary Collaboration: Bridging and blending between choreography and cognitive science

Philip Barnard, Scott deLahunta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)
12 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Two long-term sci-art research projects are described and positioned in the broader conceptual landscape of interdisciplinary collaboration. Both projects were aimed at understanding and augmenting choreographic decision-making and both were grounded in research conducted within a leading contemporary dance company. In each case, the work drew upon methods and theory from the cognitive sciences, and both had a direct impact on the way in which the company made new work. In the synthesis presented here the concept of an audit trace is introduced. Audit traces identify how specific classes of knowledge are used and transformed not only within the arts or sciences but also when arts practice is informed by science or when arts practice informs science.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)359-380
Number of pages22
JournalInterdisciplinary Science Reviews
Volume42
Issue number4
Early online date15 Dec 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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audit
art
science
dance
research project
decision making
Audit
Cognitive Science
Art
Choreography
Interdisciplinary Collaboration

Bibliographical note

Publisher Statement: This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Keywords

  • Interdisciplinary collaboration
  • long-term projects
  • contemporary dance
  • cognitive sciences
  • audit trace

Cite this

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