LUXURY MULTIHULL CRUISE CONCEPT FOR THE MEDITERREANEAN; ADOPTING ARCHITECTURAL PRINCIPLES TO REDUCE OPPERATIONAL ENERGY

Sean McCartan, C. Kvilums

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    The ultra-luxury small cruise ship sector has experienced significant growth in recent years. This paper reports on a design proposal for a catamaran eco-luxury cruise ship, which integrates a Passive Design methodology within the marine design process, with the objective of reducing energy consumption. It is an engagement in luxification, an evolution of luxury in cruising, creating a new market through Design-Driven Innovation, with the objective of offering green luxury user experience with a sense of intimacy similar to that of a super yacht. The concept shows the potential of Passive Design as a means of reducing emissions in line with EEDI (Energy Efficiency Design Index) legislation and other forthcoming standards, by reducing hotel loads such as HVAC systems and lighting. Employed in over 200,000 buildings across Europe, Passive Design has resulted in the reduction and in some cases elimination of conventional mechanical HVAC systems by adapting the morphology & orientation of a building to the area of operation, resulting in a low cost solution to resource intensive design issues, with minimum environmental impact. Inspired by a BREEAM excellence case study; the concept works on a statistical analysis of climatic variations for a range of potential vessel routes as an integral part of the design process. The resulting hybrid passive design solution is climate responsive design, minimising energy consumption and reducing operational costs - creating the opportunity for a new eco-luxury sub-sector within the ultra-luxury cruise ship market.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationDesign and Operation of Passenger Ships Conference Proceedings
    PublisherRINA
    Publication statusPublished - 2013
    EventDesign and Operation of Passenger Ships Conference - London, United Kingdom
    Duration: 20 Nov 201321 Nov 2013

    Conference

    ConferenceDesign and Operation of Passenger Ships Conference
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    CityLondon
    Period20/11/1321/11/13

    Fingerprint

    Ships
    Energy utilization
    Yachts
    Hotels
    Environmental impact
    Energy efficiency
    Costs
    Statistical methods
    Innovation
    Lighting
    HVAC

    Bibliographical note

    This paper is not available on the repository. The paper was given at the Design and Operation of Passenger Ships Conference, 20-21 November, 2013, London.

    Cite this

    McCartan, S., & Kvilums, C. (2013). LUXURY MULTIHULL CRUISE CONCEPT FOR THE MEDITERREANEAN; ADOPTING ARCHITECTURAL PRINCIPLES TO REDUCE OPPERATIONAL ENERGY. In Design and Operation of Passenger Ships Conference Proceedings RINA.

    LUXURY MULTIHULL CRUISE CONCEPT FOR THE MEDITERREANEAN; ADOPTING ARCHITECTURAL PRINCIPLES TO REDUCE OPPERATIONAL ENERGY. / McCartan, Sean; Kvilums, C.

    Design and Operation of Passenger Ships Conference Proceedings. RINA, 2013.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    McCartan, S & Kvilums, C 2013, LUXURY MULTIHULL CRUISE CONCEPT FOR THE MEDITERREANEAN; ADOPTING ARCHITECTURAL PRINCIPLES TO REDUCE OPPERATIONAL ENERGY. in Design and Operation of Passenger Ships Conference Proceedings. RINA, Design and Operation of Passenger Ships Conference, London, United Kingdom, 20/11/13.
    McCartan S, Kvilums C. LUXURY MULTIHULL CRUISE CONCEPT FOR THE MEDITERREANEAN; ADOPTING ARCHITECTURAL PRINCIPLES TO REDUCE OPPERATIONAL ENERGY. In Design and Operation of Passenger Ships Conference Proceedings. RINA. 2013
    McCartan, Sean ; Kvilums, C. / LUXURY MULTIHULL CRUISE CONCEPT FOR THE MEDITERREANEAN; ADOPTING ARCHITECTURAL PRINCIPLES TO REDUCE OPPERATIONAL ENERGY. Design and Operation of Passenger Ships Conference Proceedings. RINA, 2013.
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    abstract = "The ultra-luxury small cruise ship sector has experienced significant growth in recent years. This paper reports on a design proposal for a catamaran eco-luxury cruise ship, which integrates a Passive Design methodology within the marine design process, with the objective of reducing energy consumption. It is an engagement in luxification, an evolution of luxury in cruising, creating a new market through Design-Driven Innovation, with the objective of offering green luxury user experience with a sense of intimacy similar to that of a super yacht. The concept shows the potential of Passive Design as a means of reducing emissions in line with EEDI (Energy Efficiency Design Index) legislation and other forthcoming standards, by reducing hotel loads such as HVAC systems and lighting. Employed in over 200,000 buildings across Europe, Passive Design has resulted in the reduction and in some cases elimination of conventional mechanical HVAC systems by adapting the morphology & orientation of a building to the area of operation, resulting in a low cost solution to resource intensive design issues, with minimum environmental impact. Inspired by a BREEAM excellence case study; the concept works on a statistical analysis of climatic variations for a range of potential vessel routes as an integral part of the design process. The resulting hybrid passive design solution is climate responsive design, minimising energy consumption and reducing operational costs - creating the opportunity for a new eco-luxury sub-sector within the ultra-luxury cruise ship market.",
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