Location Independent Working In Academia: Enabling employees or supporting managerial control?

Amanda Lee, MariaLaura DiDomenico, Mark N.K. Saunders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

In this article, we consider the extent to which the practice of location independent working (LIW) enables academic employees to make choices and have agency in their life-work balance, and the extent to which it may support (or potentially be used as a form of resistance to) increased managerial control. Set within the context of an increasingly performance-led, managerialist public sector landscape, the impact and implications of these working practices are examined through the lens of labour process theory. Drawing on findings from an ongoing in-depth ethnographic study set in a post-1992 university business school in central England, we suggest that the practice of LIW is being used both to enable employees and to support managerial control.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)425-442
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Workplace Rights
Volume17
Issue number3-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Location-Independent working
  • Labour Process Theory
  • Managerialism

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