Legitimating global governance: Publicisation, affectedness, and the Committee on World Food Security

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Though global governance theorists disagree on the standard by which the legitimacy of global governance arrangements might be assessed, they do exhibit a degree of consensus on the need for more civil society participation to bridge legitimacy deficits therein. One important sub-stream of this discussion has involved assessing, therefore, the relative strengths and weaknesses of two key principles through which legitimate participants within global governance might be recognised: the ‘all-affected principle’ and the ‘all-subjected principle’. In this paper, I shift the focus of this debate to a case study with two elements. The first involves the invocation of affectedness by civil society actors as part of their attempt to reconfigure or ‘publicise’ the relationship between food system actors and global governance. The second element of the case study focusses on the principles, practices, and mechanisms that have been adopted by civil society to facilitate the participa- tion of the affected in a global governance body that is an impor- tant site for the publicisation struggle: the Committee on World Food Security. This case study reveals both what is at issue in the choice of principles of inclusion and a methodology through which the all-affected principle can be applied.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)(In-Press)
Number of pages22
JournalThird World Thematics: A TWQ Journal
Volume(In-Press)
Early online date8 Feb 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 8 Feb 2019

Fingerprint

affectedness
global governance
food
civil society
legitimacy
participation
deficit
inclusion
methodology

Bibliographical note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Third World Thematics: A TWQ Journal on 08/02/19, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/23802014.2018.1552536

Keywords

  • Civil society
  • democratisation
  • governance
  • participation and power
  • resistance and activism
  • United Nations

Cite this

Legitimating global governance : Publicisation, affectedness, and the Committee on World Food Security. / Brem-Wilson, Joshua.

In: Third World Thematics: A TWQ Journal , Vol. (In-Press), 08.02.2019, p. (In-Press).

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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