Legacy in major sport events: empirical insights from the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa

Tom Bason, David Cook, C. Anagnostopoulos

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Abstract

The awarding of the 2010 FIFA World Cup to South Africa was an historic moment for all of Africa as football’s biggest event travelled to the continent for the first time. This study, set five years on, seeks to identify the legacies left by the construction of two new stadiums in Durban and Cape Town. As part of the EU-funded CARNiVAL project, which seeks to investigate the legacies and impacts of hosting such events, interviews were conducted with key stakeholders involved in the planning of legacies in the two cities. Using Chappelet and Junod’s (2006) framework to analyse the legacies, this study found that Durban and Cape Town have used different strategies to leverage the legacies with differing results. Yet, both stadiums have suffered from the same issue; a seeming lack of need for two stadiums with capacities over 54,000, for domestic sport leagues which average fewer than 10,000 spectators Publisher statement: This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits users to copy, distribute and transmit the work for non-commercial purposes providing it is properly cited.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)44-61
Number of pages18
JournalCHOREGIA: Sports management International Journal
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Bibliographical note

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits users to copy, distribute and transmit the work for non-commercial purposes providing it is properly cited.

Keywords

  • Major Sport Events
  • Legacy
  • White Elephants
  • World Cup
  • South Africa

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