Kolkata-Coventry comparative registry study of acute heart failure: an insight into the impact of public, private and universal health systems on patient outcomes in low–middle income cities (KOLCOV HF Study)

Suvro Banerjee, Swapan Kumar Halder, Peter Kimani, Patrick Tran, Danish Ali, Marina Roelas, Nicholas Weight, Moez Dungarwalla, Prithwish Banerjee

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    Abstract

    Introduction: Survival gaps in acute heart failure (AHF) continue to expand globally. Multinational heart failure (HF) registries have highlighted variations between countries. Whether discrepancies in HF practice and outcomes occur across different health systems (ie, private, public or universal healthcare) within a city or between countries remain unclear. Insight into organisational care is also scarce. With increasing public scrutiny of health inequalities, a study to address these limitations is timely. Method: KOLCOV-HF study prospectively compared patients with AHF in public (Nil Ratan Sircar Hospital (NRS)) versus private (Apollo Gleneagles Hospital (AGH)) hospitals of Kolkata, India, and one with universal health coverage in a socioeconomically comparable city of Coventry, England (University Hospitals Coventry & Warwickshire (UHCW)). Data variables were adapted from UK’s National HF Audit programme, collected over 24 months. Predictors of in-hospital mortality and length of hospitalisation were assessed for each centre. Results: Among 1652 patients, in-hospital mortality was highest in government-funded NRS (11.9%) while 3 miles north, AGH had significantly lower mortality (7.5%, p=0.034), similar to UHCW (8%). This could be attributed to distinct HF phenotypes and differences in clinical and organisational care. As expected, low blood pressure was associated with a significantly greater risk of death in patients served by public hospitals UHCW and NRS. Conclusion: Marked differences in HF characteristics, management and outcomes exist intra-regionally, and between low–middle versus high-income countries across private, public and universal healthcare systems. Physicians and policymakers should take caution when applying country-level data locally when developing strategies to address local evidence-practice gaps in HF.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article numbere001964
    Number of pages11
    JournalOpen Heart
    Volume9
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2022

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    This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

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