Knowing our ‘ABCs’: self-reflection using cognitive-behavioural formulation of client–therapist interaction in work with a survivor of torture

Faith Martin, Sobia Khan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Self-reflection can aid therapist development, particularly interpersonal skills. It can be achieved through using cognitive-behavioural therapy techniques, for example, formulations of the therapist's cognitions and behaviours have been used to aid self-reflection. As interpersonal skills may be an area that benefits from self-reflection, an approach to formulating the interaction between client and therapist may be beneficial. This study reports the use of simple ‘antecedent-belief-consequence’ (ABC) formulations for the client and therapist to conceptualize their interaction. This description of a treatment failure focuses on cross-cultural work with a survivor of torture, where self-reflection may be particularly indicated to promote cultural competence and address the impact of the content on the therapist. ABC formulations for the client and therapist were completed and through this structured self-reflection, the therapist was able to identify the impact of her own beliefs on the process of therapy. This method identified areas for further development and generated hypotheses for how to continue therapy with this client. Using ABC formulations then may provide a useful and structured way to conduct self-reflection with explicit focus on the interaction between client and therapist.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere11
JournalCognitive Behaviour Therapist
Volume8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 May 2015
Externally publishedYes

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