Kinematic adaptations in sprint acceleration performances without and with the constraint of holding a field hockey stick

Maximilian Wdowski, Marianne J.R. Gittoes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the technique adaptations made when performing sprint-based tasks without (free condition) and with (constrained condition) the constraints of carrying a field hockey stick. Three free and three constrained maximal sprint accelerations were performed by 18 experienced university male field hockey players (age = 20 +/- 1 years, body mass = 73.3 +/- 7.1 kg, and stature = 1.78 +/- 0.05 m). An automatic motion analysis system tracked sagittal plane active marker locations (200 Hz). M sprint velocity during the 18-22 m (free: 8.03 +/- 0.43 m/s; constrained: 7.93 +/- 0.36 m/s) interval was significantly (p = 0.03) different between free and constrained conditions. While the M stride length and stride frequency was similar between free and constrained conditions in the 2-13 m capture volume, the free condition elicited a 0.10 m/s faster (p = 0.03) stride velocity. Further significant differences were found between free and constrained kinematic profiles (p < or = 0.05) for the hip angular velocity at touchdown during the 2-12 m interval of the sprints and in the overall sprint technique coordination between free and constrained conditions. Performance and technique adaptations indicated that sprint-training protocols for field sports should integrate specific equipment constraints to ensure explicit replication of the mechanical demands of the skills underpinning superior performance.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-153
Number of pages11
JournalSports Biomechanics
Volume12
Issue number2
Early online date10 Dec 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013

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Hockey
Biomechanical Phenomena
Sports
Hip
Equipment and Supplies
N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine trimethylsulfonium salt

Keywords

  • Stride analyses
  • lower extremity
  • technique
  • training specificity
  • field sports

Cite this

Kinematic adaptations in sprint acceleration performances without and with the constraint of holding a field hockey stick. / Wdowski, Maximilian; Gittoes, Marianne J.R.

In: Sports Biomechanics, Vol. 12, No. 2, 06.2013, p. 143-153.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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