Is the Ergogenicity of Caffeine Affected by Increasing Age? The Direct Effect of a Physiological Concentration of Caffeine on the Power Output of Maximally Stimulated EDL and Diaphragm Muscle Isolated From the Mouse

Jason Tallis, Rob S. James, Val M. Cox, Michael J. Duncan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)
39 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Caffeine is a well-established performance enhancing nutritional supplement in a young healthy population, however far less is known about how its ergogenicity is affected by increasing age. A recent review has highlighted the value of studies examining the direct effect of caffeine on isolated skeletal muscle contractility, but the present work is the first to assess the direct effect of 70µM caffeine (physiological maximum) on the maximal power output of isolated mammalian muscle from an age range representing developmental to early ageing. Method: Female CD1 mice were aged to 3, 10, 30 and 50 weeks (n = 20 in each case) and either whole EDL or a section of the diaphragm was isolated and maximal power output determined using the work loop technique. Once contractile performance was maximised, each muscle preparation was treated with 70µM caffeine and its contractile performance was measured for a further 60 minutes. Results: In both mouse EDL and diaphragm 70µM caffeine treatment resulted in a significant increase in maximal muscle power output that was greatest at 10 or 30 weeks (up to 5% & 6% improvement respectively). This potentiation of maximal muscle power output was significantly lower at the early ageing time point, 50 weeks (up to 3% & 2% improvement respectively), and in mice in the developmental stage, at 3 weeks of age (up to 1% & 2% improvement respectively). Conclusion: Uniquely, the present findings indicate a reduced age specific sensitivity to the performance enhancing effect of caffeine in developmental and aged mice which is likely to be attributed to age related muscle growth and degradation, respectively. Importantly, the findings indicate that caffeine may still provide a substantial ergogenic aid in older populations which could prove important for improving functional capacity in tasks of daily living.
Publisher Statement: The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12603-016-0832-9  

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)440-448
Number of pages9
JournalThe Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging
Volume21
Issue number4
Early online date26 Oct 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2017

Bibliographical note

The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12603-016-0832-9

Keywords

  • Dynapenia
  • Ergogenic Aid
  • Force
  • Sarcopenia
  • Skeletal Muscle
  • Work Loop

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