Is being underweight associated with impairments in quality of life in the absence of significant eating disorder pathology?

P. E. Jenkins, R. R. Hoste, C. S. Conley, C. Meyer, J. M. Blissett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Few studies have compared low-weight individuals with eating disorder (ED) pathology with similar-weight individuals without significant pathology despite the fact that body weight is often used as a key outcome within ED research. This study compared quality of life (QoL) in one group with high levels of ED pathology to a group with low ED pathology, matched by body mass index (BMI). The high ED group reported significantly lower ED-specific quality of life (EDQoL) than the low ED group. These findings suggest that young women with high levels of ED pathology report significantly more impaired QoL than comparable young women with no ED pathology, and that being underweight alone is not a primary contributor to poorer EDQoL.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)61-64
Number of pages4
JournalEating and Weight Disorders
Volume16
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Thinness
Quality of Life
Pathology
Feeding and Eating Disorders
Weights and Measures
Body Mass Index
Body Weight

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Eating disorders
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Is being underweight associated with impairments in quality of life in the absence of significant eating disorder pathology? / Jenkins, P. E.; Hoste, R. R.; Conley, C. S.; Meyer, C.; Blissett, J. M.

In: Eating and Weight Disorders, Vol. 16, No. 1, 03.2011, p. 61-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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