Involving people with learning disabilities in nurse education: towards an inclusive approach

Martin Bollard, John Lahiff, N. Parkes

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    17 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    There is limited evidence that explores how to effectively include people with learning disabilities in nurse education in the UK. The majority of reported work relates to mental health nursing and social work training (Morgan and Jones, 2009). This paper specifically reports on the processes and activities undertaken by the authors with people with learning disabilities in the development of a new BSc learning disability nursing programme, a specific branch of nursing in the UK. In doing so, findings and discussion from two separate projects involving students and people with learning disabilities will be integrated into the paper. EPICURE (Engagement, Processing, Interpretation, Critique, Usefulness, Relevance and Ethics (Stige et al. 2009) is adopted as a qualitative framework throughout the paper to evaluate the reported work that took place between September 2006 and October 2010. Suggestions are therefore made regarding the benefits and challenges of striving towards an inclusive approach to user involvement in nurse education, with particular reference to learning disability. The work presented in the paper demonstrates how through careful involvement of this population, deeper learning opportunities for all nursing students can be created.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)173–177
    JournalNurse Education Today
    Volume32
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

    Fingerprint

    Learning Disorders
    Disabled Persons
    learning disability
    nurse
    Nurses
    Education
    nursing
    education
    Nursing
    Psychiatric Nursing
    Nursing Students
    Social Work
    Ethics
    Workplace
    social work
    student
    mental health
    moral philosophy
    Learning
    Students

    Bibliographical note

    The full text of this article is not available from the repository.

    Keywords

    • learning disability
    • intellectual disability and user involvement
    • adult learning acknowledgements

    Cite this

    Involving people with learning disabilities in nurse education: towards an inclusive approach. / Bollard, Martin; Lahiff, John; Parkes, N.

    In: Nurse Education Today, Vol. 32, No. 2, 2011, p. 173–177.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Bollard, Martin ; Lahiff, John ; Parkes, N. / Involving people with learning disabilities in nurse education: towards an inclusive approach. In: Nurse Education Today. 2011 ; Vol. 32, No. 2. pp. 173–177.
    @article{ee41803100ff43d5a9dc4082c647b5c9,
    title = "Involving people with learning disabilities in nurse education: towards an inclusive approach",
    abstract = "There is limited evidence that explores how to effectively include people with learning disabilities in nurse education in the UK. The majority of reported work relates to mental health nursing and social work training (Morgan and Jones, 2009). This paper specifically reports on the processes and activities undertaken by the authors with people with learning disabilities in the development of a new BSc learning disability nursing programme, a specific branch of nursing in the UK. In doing so, findings and discussion from two separate projects involving students and people with learning disabilities will be integrated into the paper. EPICURE (Engagement, Processing, Interpretation, Critique, Usefulness, Relevance and Ethics (Stige et al. 2009) is adopted as a qualitative framework throughout the paper to evaluate the reported work that took place between September 2006 and October 2010. Suggestions are therefore made regarding the benefits and challenges of striving towards an inclusive approach to user involvement in nurse education, with particular reference to learning disability. The work presented in the paper demonstrates how through careful involvement of this population, deeper learning opportunities for all nursing students can be created.",
    keywords = "learning disability, intellectual disability and user involvement, adult learning acknowledgements",
    author = "Martin Bollard and John Lahiff and N. Parkes",
    note = "The full text of this article is not available from the repository.",
    year = "2011",
    doi = "10.1016/j.nedt.2011.10.002",
    language = "English",
    volume = "32",
    pages = "173–177",
    journal = "Nurse Education Today",
    issn = "0260-6917",
    publisher = "Elsevier",
    number = "2",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Involving people with learning disabilities in nurse education: towards an inclusive approach

    AU - Bollard, Martin

    AU - Lahiff, John

    AU - Parkes, N.

    N1 - The full text of this article is not available from the repository.

    PY - 2011

    Y1 - 2011

    N2 - There is limited evidence that explores how to effectively include people with learning disabilities in nurse education in the UK. The majority of reported work relates to mental health nursing and social work training (Morgan and Jones, 2009). This paper specifically reports on the processes and activities undertaken by the authors with people with learning disabilities in the development of a new BSc learning disability nursing programme, a specific branch of nursing in the UK. In doing so, findings and discussion from two separate projects involving students and people with learning disabilities will be integrated into the paper. EPICURE (Engagement, Processing, Interpretation, Critique, Usefulness, Relevance and Ethics (Stige et al. 2009) is adopted as a qualitative framework throughout the paper to evaluate the reported work that took place between September 2006 and October 2010. Suggestions are therefore made regarding the benefits and challenges of striving towards an inclusive approach to user involvement in nurse education, with particular reference to learning disability. The work presented in the paper demonstrates how through careful involvement of this population, deeper learning opportunities for all nursing students can be created.

    AB - There is limited evidence that explores how to effectively include people with learning disabilities in nurse education in the UK. The majority of reported work relates to mental health nursing and social work training (Morgan and Jones, 2009). This paper specifically reports on the processes and activities undertaken by the authors with people with learning disabilities in the development of a new BSc learning disability nursing programme, a specific branch of nursing in the UK. In doing so, findings and discussion from two separate projects involving students and people with learning disabilities will be integrated into the paper. EPICURE (Engagement, Processing, Interpretation, Critique, Usefulness, Relevance and Ethics (Stige et al. 2009) is adopted as a qualitative framework throughout the paper to evaluate the reported work that took place between September 2006 and October 2010. Suggestions are therefore made regarding the benefits and challenges of striving towards an inclusive approach to user involvement in nurse education, with particular reference to learning disability. The work presented in the paper demonstrates how through careful involvement of this population, deeper learning opportunities for all nursing students can be created.

    KW - learning disability

    KW - intellectual disability and user involvement

    KW - adult learning acknowledgements

    U2 - 10.1016/j.nedt.2011.10.002

    DO - 10.1016/j.nedt.2011.10.002

    M3 - Article

    VL - 32

    SP - 173

    EP - 177

    JO - Nurse Education Today

    JF - Nurse Education Today

    SN - 0260-6917

    IS - 2

    ER -