Investigating the Impact of Caprock Morphology on CO2 Plume Migration and Trapping Mechanisms Using the MRST-CO2lab and ECLIPSE-Blackoil Codes.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

Abstract


One of the possible options to mitigate the climate change is sequestering anthropogenic carbon in the deep saline aquifers. When injected in the formation, due to the difference in buoyancy forces between the gas and the brine, the free phase CO2 is driven upwards and will eventually collect as a separate, thin layer beneath the caprock. Therefore, the structural geometry of this upper seal plays a significant role in the long-term CO2 plume migration and trapping behaviour. In practice, at the kilometre scale, there are considerable topography changes, and the caprock structure is identified by domes and anticlines. Researchers primarily use 3D numerical simulators to study the long-term behaviour of the CO2 plume. This study looks at the impact of the dipping and sinusoidal pattern between two strata on the storage process using a full 3D simulation as well as an upscaled model based on the vertical equilibrium (VE) assumption. The 3D simulation is performed using the ECLIPSE-blackoil and the MRST (MATLAB Reservoir Simulation Toolkit) is used for the VE approach. Under the VE assumption, the CO2 plume flow in 3D can be approximated in terms of its thickness to obtain a 2D simulation model, which significantly decrease the computational cost and avoids the discretization error caused by limited vertical resolution in a 3D model. Over the time period simulated, our observations of lateral migration showed that the CO2 and resident brine became quickly separated and formed two separate layers. To our knowledge, this is one of the first comparisons between the standard three-dimensional reservoir simulator and two-dimensional VE formulation for studying the impact of caprock morphology on CO2 storage.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSSRN (https://ssrn.com/abstract=3366371)
Number of pages8
Publication statusPublished - 11 Apr 2019
Event14th International conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies - Melbourne convention and exhibition centre, Melbourne , Australia
Duration: 21 Oct 201825 Oct 2018
http://www.ghgt.info/

Conference

Conference14th International conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies
Abbreviated titleGHGT-14
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne
Period21/10/1825/10/18
Internet address

Fingerprint

trapping
plume
brine
simulation
simulator
anticline
buoyancy
dome
topography
aquifer
geometry
climate change
code
carbon
gas
cost

Keywords

  • Trapping mechanisms
  • GHGT-14

Cite this

Investigating the Impact of Caprock Morphology on CO2 Plume Migration and Trapping Mechanisms Using the MRST-CO2lab and ECLIPSE-Blackoil Codes. / Ahmadinia, Masoud; Shariatipour, Seyed Mohammad.

SSRN (https://ssrn.com/abstract=3366371). 2019.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

Ahmadinia, M & Shariatipour, SM 2019, Investigating the Impact of Caprock Morphology on CO2 Plume Migration and Trapping Mechanisms Using the MRST-CO2lab and ECLIPSE-Blackoil Codes. in SSRN (https://ssrn.com/abstract=3366371). 14th International conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies, Melbourne , Australia, 21/10/18.
@inproceedings{d2068d4d9a7b4cc8ae664a424e11cc65,
title = "Investigating the Impact of Caprock Morphology on CO2 Plume Migration and Trapping Mechanisms Using the MRST-CO2lab and ECLIPSE-Blackoil Codes.",
abstract = "One of the possible options to mitigate the climate change is sequestering anthropogenic carbon in the deep saline aquifers. When injected in the formation, due to the difference in buoyancy forces between the gas and the brine, the free phase CO2 is driven upwards and will eventually collect as a separate, thin layer beneath the caprock. Therefore, the structural geometry of this upper seal plays a significant role in the long-term CO2 plume migration and trapping behaviour. In practice, at the kilometre scale, there are considerable topography changes, and the caprock structure is identified by domes and anticlines. Researchers primarily use 3D numerical simulators to study the long-term behaviour of the CO2 plume. This study looks at the impact of the dipping and sinusoidal pattern between two strata on the storage process using a full 3D simulation as well as an upscaled model based on the vertical equilibrium (VE) assumption. The 3D simulation is performed using the ECLIPSE-blackoil and the MRST (MATLAB Reservoir Simulation Toolkit) is used for the VE approach. Under the VE assumption, the CO2 plume flow in 3D can be approximated in terms of its thickness to obtain a 2D simulation model, which significantly decrease the computational cost and avoids the discretization error caused by limited vertical resolution in a 3D model. Over the time period simulated, our observations of lateral migration showed that the CO2 and resident brine became quickly separated and formed two separate layers. To our knowledge, this is one of the first comparisons between the standard three-dimensional reservoir simulator and two-dimensional VE formulation for studying the impact of caprock morphology on CO2 storage.",
keywords = "Trapping mechanisms, GHGT-14",
author = "Masoud Ahmadinia and Shariatipour, {Seyed Mohammad}",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
day = "11",
language = "English",
booktitle = "SSRN (https://ssrn.com/abstract=3366371)",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Investigating the Impact of Caprock Morphology on CO2 Plume Migration and Trapping Mechanisms Using the MRST-CO2lab and ECLIPSE-Blackoil Codes.

AU - Ahmadinia, Masoud

AU - Shariatipour, Seyed Mohammad

PY - 2019/4/11

Y1 - 2019/4/11

N2 - One of the possible options to mitigate the climate change is sequestering anthropogenic carbon in the deep saline aquifers. When injected in the formation, due to the difference in buoyancy forces between the gas and the brine, the free phase CO2 is driven upwards and will eventually collect as a separate, thin layer beneath the caprock. Therefore, the structural geometry of this upper seal plays a significant role in the long-term CO2 plume migration and trapping behaviour. In practice, at the kilometre scale, there are considerable topography changes, and the caprock structure is identified by domes and anticlines. Researchers primarily use 3D numerical simulators to study the long-term behaviour of the CO2 plume. This study looks at the impact of the dipping and sinusoidal pattern between two strata on the storage process using a full 3D simulation as well as an upscaled model based on the vertical equilibrium (VE) assumption. The 3D simulation is performed using the ECLIPSE-blackoil and the MRST (MATLAB Reservoir Simulation Toolkit) is used for the VE approach. Under the VE assumption, the CO2 plume flow in 3D can be approximated in terms of its thickness to obtain a 2D simulation model, which significantly decrease the computational cost and avoids the discretization error caused by limited vertical resolution in a 3D model. Over the time period simulated, our observations of lateral migration showed that the CO2 and resident brine became quickly separated and formed two separate layers. To our knowledge, this is one of the first comparisons between the standard three-dimensional reservoir simulator and two-dimensional VE formulation for studying the impact of caprock morphology on CO2 storage.

AB - One of the possible options to mitigate the climate change is sequestering anthropogenic carbon in the deep saline aquifers. When injected in the formation, due to the difference in buoyancy forces between the gas and the brine, the free phase CO2 is driven upwards and will eventually collect as a separate, thin layer beneath the caprock. Therefore, the structural geometry of this upper seal plays a significant role in the long-term CO2 plume migration and trapping behaviour. In practice, at the kilometre scale, there are considerable topography changes, and the caprock structure is identified by domes and anticlines. Researchers primarily use 3D numerical simulators to study the long-term behaviour of the CO2 plume. This study looks at the impact of the dipping and sinusoidal pattern between two strata on the storage process using a full 3D simulation as well as an upscaled model based on the vertical equilibrium (VE) assumption. The 3D simulation is performed using the ECLIPSE-blackoil and the MRST (MATLAB Reservoir Simulation Toolkit) is used for the VE approach. Under the VE assumption, the CO2 plume flow in 3D can be approximated in terms of its thickness to obtain a 2D simulation model, which significantly decrease the computational cost and avoids the discretization error caused by limited vertical resolution in a 3D model. Over the time period simulated, our observations of lateral migration showed that the CO2 and resident brine became quickly separated and formed two separate layers. To our knowledge, this is one of the first comparisons between the standard three-dimensional reservoir simulator and two-dimensional VE formulation for studying the impact of caprock morphology on CO2 storage.

KW - Trapping mechanisms

KW - GHGT-14

UR - https://ssrn.com/abstract=3366371

M3 - Conference proceeding

BT - SSRN (https://ssrn.com/abstract=3366371)

ER -