Interpersonal synchrony affects performers’ sense of agency

Paul Reddish, Eddie M.W. Tong, Jonathan Jong, Harvey Whitehouse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We investigated if interpersonal synchrony can lead to a sense of agency over another’s movement (extended self-agency). In Experiment 1, we found that extended self-agency was greater during synchrony than asynchrony. However, we also found that synchrony boosted participants’ sense that the other performer had agency over their actions (extended other-agency). This finding may have been because synchrony created a sense of distributed agency. If so, then manipulating the degree of influence participants have over their partner’s behavior should boost extended self-agency when leading and extended other-agency when following. Experiment 2 confirmed these predictions. We also found synchrony created a sense of joint-agency. These results show how interpersonal synchrony can modulate a core aspect of the self.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)(In-Press)
Number of pages24
JournalSelf and Identity
Volume(In-Press)
Early online date22 Apr 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 22 Apr 2019

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Keywords

  • agency
  • coordination
  • joint action
  • self
  • Synchrony

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Interpersonal synchrony affects performers’ sense of agency. / Reddish, Paul; Tong, Eddie M.W.; Jong, Jonathan; Whitehouse, Harvey.

In: Self and Identity, Vol. (In-Press), 22.04.2019, p. (In-Press).

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reddish, Paul ; Tong, Eddie M.W. ; Jong, Jonathan ; Whitehouse, Harvey. / Interpersonal synchrony affects performers’ sense of agency. In: Self and Identity. 2019 ; Vol. (In-Press). pp. (In-Press).
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