International Perceptions of Stalking and Responsibility: The Influence of Prior Relationship and Severity of Behavior

A.J. Scott, N. Rajakaruna, L. Sheridan, Emma Sleath

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This study investigates the influence of prior relationship and severity of behavior on perceptions of stalking and responsibility with a combined sample of 1,080 members of the community from Australia, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Participants were presented with 1 of 12 versions of a hypothetical stalking scenario and responded to scale items regarding the behavior of a male perpetrator toward a female target. Prior relationship and severity of behavior influenced perceptions of stalking and responsibility, and the pattern of findings was consistent across the three countries. The perpetrator’s behavior was perceived to constitute stalking, and necessitate police intervention and a criminal conviction to the greatest extent when the perpetrator and target were portrayed as strangers. In addition, the target was perceived to be the least responsible and the perpetrator was perceived to be the most responsible when they were portrayed as strangers.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)220-236
    JournalCriminal Justice and Behavior
    Volume41
    Issue number2
    Early online date30 Aug 2013
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Feb 2014

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    Stalking
    stalking
    responsibility
    Police
    police
    scenario
    community

    Bibliographical note

    The full text of this item is not available from the repository.

    Keywords

    • stalking
    • perceptions
    • prior relationship
    • severity of behaviour
    • just world hypothesis

    Cite this

    International Perceptions of Stalking and Responsibility: The Influence of Prior Relationship and Severity of Behavior. / Scott, A.J.; Rajakaruna, N.; Sheridan, L.; Sleath, Emma.

    In: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Vol. 41, No. 2, 02.2014, p. 220-236.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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