Intermittent self-catheterisation in women: reducing the risk of UTIs

Alison Bardsley

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Intermittent self-catheterisation (ISC) is the insertion and removal of a catheter to drain the bladder and is a safe and effective way to preserve renal function. It can be used as a one-off intervention to drain urine post-operatively or to measure residual urine volumes if a bladder scanner is unavailable. ISC can also be used as a long-term option to manage bladder dysfunction, and for some provides an excellent option to maintain independence and improve quality of life. Urinary tract infections are a common complication for women undertaking ISC. This article explores the prevention of urinary tract infections in women undertaking long-term ISC for the management of bladder dysfunction.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)S20-S29
    JournalBritish Journal of Nursing
    Volume23
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 10 Oct 2014

    Fingerprint

    Catheterization
    Urinary Bladder
    Urinary Tract Infections
    Urine
    Residual Volume
    Self Care
    Catheters
    Quality of Life
    Kidney

    Bibliographical note

    This article is not yet available on the repository

    Keywords

    • Urinary catheterisation
    • Urinary tract infections
    • Urinary retention
    • Self-care
    • Catheters

    Cite this

    Intermittent self-catheterisation in women: reducing the risk of UTIs. / Bardsley, Alison.

    In: British Journal of Nursing, Vol. 23, 10.10.2014, p. S20-S29.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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