Intentional cargo disruption: Examining threats, systemic vulnerabilities and securitisation measures in complex global supply chains

C. McGreevy, Wayne Harrop

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Global trade and commerce requires products to be securely contained and transferred in a timely way across great distances and between national boundaries. Throughout the process, cargo and containers are stored, handled and checked by a range of authorities and authorised agents. Intermodal transportation involves the use of container ships, planes, railway systems, land bridges, road networks and barges. This paper examines the the nefarious nature of intentional disruption and nefarious risks associated with the movement of cargo and container freight. The paper explores main threats, vulnerabilities and security measures relevant to significant intermodal transit risk issues such as theft, piracy, terrorism, contamination, counterfeiting and product tampering. Three risk and vulnerability models are examined and basic standards and regulations that are relevant to safe and secure transit of container goods across international supply networks are outlined.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)326-245
    JournalJournal of business continuity & emergency planning
    Volume8
    Issue number4
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2015

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    Security Measures
    Theft
    Terrorism
    Ships

    Bibliographical note

    This paper is not available on the repository

    Keywords

    • civil defense
    • commercial phenomena
    • devices
    • human
    • organization and management
    • supply and distribution
    • terrorism
    • traffic and transport

    Cite this

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    KW - commercial phenomena

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    KW - organization and management

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