Insolvency of Small Civil Engineering Firms: Critical Strategic Factors

Hafiz A. Alaka, Lukumon O. Oyedele, Hakeem A. Owolabi, Muhammad Bilal, Saheed O. Ajayi, Olugbenga O. Akinade

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)
17 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Construction industry insolvency studies have failed to stem the industry's high insolvency tide because many focus on big civil engineering firms (CEF) when over 90% of firms in the industry are small or micro (S&M). This study thus set out to uncover insolvency criteria of S&M CEFs and the underlying factors using mixed methods. Using convenience sampling, the storytelling method was used to execute interviews of 16 respondents from insolvent firms. Narrative and thematic analysis were used to extract 17 criteria under 2 groups. Criteria were used to formulate a questionnaire, of which 81 completed copies were received and analyzed using Cronbach's alpha coefficient and relevance index score for reliability and ranking, respectively. The five most relevant criteria were economic recession, immigration, too many new firms springing up, collecting receivables, and burden of sustainable construction. The four underlying factors established through factor analysis were market forces, competence-based management, operations efficiency and other management issues, and information management. The factors were in line with Mintzberg's and Porter's strategy theories. The results demonstrate that insolvency factors affecting big and small CEF can be quite different and, sometimes, even opposite. This research will provide a unique resource on the factors that should make potential owners of S&M CEF cautious. The criteria are potential variables for insolvency prediction models for S&M CEFs.

Original languageEnglish
Article number04016026
JournalJournal of Professional Issues in Engineering Education and Practice
Volume143
Issue number3
Early online date30 Nov 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Civil engineering
Tides
Factor analysis
Construction industry
Information management
Industry
Sampling
Economics
Factors
Insolvency

Keywords

  • Civil engineering firms
  • Construction industry
  • Insolvency
  • Mixed method
  • Small and micro firms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Industrial relations
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

Insolvency of Small Civil Engineering Firms : Critical Strategic Factors. / Alaka, Hafiz A.; Oyedele, Lukumon O.; Owolabi, Hakeem A.; Bilal, Muhammad; Ajayi, Saheed O.; Akinade, Olugbenga O.

In: Journal of Professional Issues in Engineering Education and Practice, Vol. 143, No. 3, 04016026, 01.07.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alaka, Hafiz A. ; Oyedele, Lukumon O. ; Owolabi, Hakeem A. ; Bilal, Muhammad ; Ajayi, Saheed O. ; Akinade, Olugbenga O. / Insolvency of Small Civil Engineering Firms : Critical Strategic Factors. In: Journal of Professional Issues in Engineering Education and Practice. 2017 ; Vol. 143, No. 3.
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