Innovations in Practice: The efficacy of nonviolent resistance groups in treating aggressive and controlling children and young people: a preliminary analysis of pilot NVR groups in Kent

Mary Newman, Catrin Fagan, Rebecca Webb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)
210 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background Conduct disorders and adolescent violence have been found to be a significant problem in the United Kingdom. Method Nonviolent Resistance (NVR) Parenting Groups were piloted in Kent to address the demand on CAMHS for young people with this issue, and preliminary analysis on outcome measures was conducted. Results A significant difference in a positive direction was found on all but one of the measurements used. Conclusion Findings suggest that using NVR methods in a group format is an effective intervention for these families. De-escalation and acts of unconditional love were rated by parents as the most useful interventions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)138-141
JournalChild and Adolescent Mental Health
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2014
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

The running title of this preprint version differs to the published title: A Preliminary Analysis of Pilot NVR Groups in Kent
"This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: Newman, M., Fagan, C. and Webb, R. (2014) Innovations in Practice: The efficacy of nonviolent resistance groups in treating aggressive and controlling children and young people: a preliminary analysis of pilot NVR groups in Kent. Child and adolescent mental health 19 (2), 138-141, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12049"

Keywords

  • Adolescent violence
  • conduct disorders
  • parenting
  • nonviolent resistance

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