Influence of precursor chemistry in the property of carbon nanodots and its application for the degradation of methyl orange

Jessa C. Leuterio, Drexel H. Camacho, Jose Paolo O. Bantang, Cristian Ryan A. Argamino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Carbon nanodots (CNDs) are interesting materials from renewable sources that exhibit unique fluorescence property. This study reports that sulfated carrageenan (ᴋ-, ɩ-, λ-) as carbon precursors for CNDs impart unique properties not observed in a non-sulfated source. Hydrothermal process afforded CNDs having quasi-spherical shapes (TEM), nano sizes (TEM: 3.8 nm; DLS 1.0–2.3 nm), luminous green property under UV light, and presence of sulfur in CNDs (EDS, FTIR). The CNDs were embedded in a carrageenan film matrix to prevent its aggregation and to improve its stability affording brown-colored free-standing films that have better stability (zeta potential) compared to bare CNDs in solution. The CNDs from carrageenan exhibited unique acidic property in water, which is not observed in CNDs from galactose indicating that the sulfate-laden carrageenan precursor imparts unique property to the CNDs. Degradation activity on methyl orange (MO) dye was only observed for CNDs derived from carrageenan and not from galactose confirming the critical role of precursor chemistry in imparting unique acidic properties to the resulting CNDs. The study demonstrated the difference in the carrageenan-based CNDs compared to those prepared from simple sugar and showed its application for the degradation of dyes without the need for direct exposure to sunlight.

Original languageEnglish
Article number125668
JournalMaterials Chemistry and Physics
Volume278
Early online date20 Dec 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Feb 2022
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding: This work was supported by the Philippine Department of Science and Technology-Science Education Institute (DOST-SEI) through the Accelerated Science and Technology Human Resource Development (ASTHRDP) program for the graduate scholarship grant to J. C. Leuterio. We acknowledge De La Salle University-Central Instrumentation Facility (DLSU-CIF) for the Graduate Research Residency Program support to J. C. Leuterio. The DLSU-CIF NMR and Spectroscopy laboratories are acknowledged for the use of instruments. We thank Ms. May Bernardo of UP Manila for her valuable help in the Fluorescence analysis. We wish to acknowledge Virgilio Ebajo, Jr. Jude Rolan dela Cruz, Alona Intac, and Deanne Hazel Pelobello of DLSU-CIF for assistance in conducting the experiments.

Funding Information:
Funding: This work was supported by the Philippine Department of Science and Technology-Science Education Institute (DOST-SEI) through the Accelerated Science and Technology Human Resource Development (ASTHRDP) program for the graduate scholarship grant to J. C. Leuterio. We acknowledge De La Salle University-Central Instrumentation Facility (DLSU-CIF) for the Graduate Research Residency Program support to J. C. Leuterio. The DLSU-CIF NMR and Spectroscopy laboratories are acknowledged for the use of instruments. We thank Ms. May Bernardo of UP Manila for her valuable help in the Fluorescence analysis. We wish to acknowledge Virgilio Ebajo, Jr., Jude Rolan dela Cruz, Alona Intac, and Deanne Hazel Pelobello of DLSU-CIF for assistance in conducting the experiments.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Elsevier B.V.

Keywords

  • Carbon nanodots
  • Carrageenan
  • Film composite
  • Methyl orange
  • Sensing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

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