Increased physical activity does not improve obesity-induced decreases in muscle quality in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

Frank Seebacher, Rob James

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Obesity has a negative effect on muscle contractile function, and the effects of obesity are not reversed by weight loss. It is therefore important to determine how muscle function can be restored, and exercise is the most promising approach. We tested the hypothesis (in zebrafish, Danio rerio) that moderate aerobic exercise (forced swimming for 30 min per day, raising metabolic rates to at least twice resting levels) will alleviate the negative effects of obesity of muscle function. We allocated zebrafish randomly to experimental treatments in a fully factorial design with diet treatment (three levels: lean control, diet-induced obese, obese followed by weigh loss [obese-lean]), and exercise (exercise and sedentary control) as independent factors. Treatments were conducted for 10 weeks, and we measured locomotor performance, isolated muscle mechanics, and myosin heavy chain composition. Obesity led to decreased muscle force production per unit area (p = 0.01), and slowed muscle contraction (p = 0.004) and relaxation rates (p = 0.02). These effects were not reversible by weight loss or exercise. However, at the level implemented in our experimental animals, neither diet nor exercise affected swimming performance or myosin heavy chain concentrations. The moderate levels of exercise we implemented therefore are not sufficient to reverse the effects of obesity on muscle function, and higher intensity or a combination of modes of exercise may be necessary to improve muscle quality during obesity and following weight loss.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)(In-Press)
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume(In-Press)
Early online date3 Oct 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 3 Oct 2019

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Zebrafish
Obesity
Muscles
Weight Loss
Myosin Heavy Chains
Diet
Muscle Contraction
Mechanics
Exercise

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Increased physical activity does not improve obesity-induced decreases in muscle quality in zebrafish (Danio rerio). / Seebacher, Frank; James, Rob.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. (In-Press), 03.10.2019, p. (In-Press).

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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