Improving aircraft safety

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    1754 people were killed on British roads in 2012. In the corresponding period 306 people worldwide died as a result of accidents to commercial jet transport aircraft. Aviation has developed a remarkable safety record and human factors has been at the forefront. The safety principles developed in the aviation industry are now being adapted and adopted in a range of new application areas, which also seem to be showing similar safety benefits. However, the nature of all modern organisations, including airlines, has changed considerably in the last decade; safety management systems, within which aviation psychology makes a significant contribution, need to evolve to keep pace.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)90-95
    JournalPsychologist
    Volume27
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

    Fingerprint

    Aviation
    Aircraft
    Safety
    Safety Management
    Accidents
    Industry
    Organizations
    Psychology

    Bibliographical note

    The full text is available free from the link given.

    Keywords

    • aircraft safety
    • human factors
    • human error

    Cite this

    Improving aircraft safety. / Harris, Don.

    In: Psychologist, Vol. 27, No. 2, 2014, p. 90-95.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Harris, D 2014, 'Improving aircraft safety' Psychologist, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 90-95.
    Harris, Don. / Improving aircraft safety. In: Psychologist. 2014 ; Vol. 27, No. 2. pp. 90-95.
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