Impact of time and work:rest ratio matched sprint interval training programmes on performance: A randomised controlled trial

Molly C. Lloyd Jones, Martyn Morris, John R. Jakeman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to examine the effects of a short training intervention using two repeated sprint protocols matched for total sprint duration and work:rest ratio.DesignRandomised-controlled trial.MethodsThirty physically active males were randomly allocated to one of two sprint training groups: a 6 s group, a 30 s group or a non-exercising control. The training groups were matched for work:rest ratio and total sprint time per session, and completed 6 training sessions over a 2-week period. Before and after the 2 week training period, participants completed a VO2max test and a 10 km time trial on a cycle ergometer.ResultsTime trial performance increased significantly by 5.1% in 6 s (630 ± 115 s to 598 ± 92 s; p < 0.05) and 6.2% in 30 s (579 ± 68 s to 543 ± 85 s; p < 0.05) from baseline testing, but there was no significant change in the control group (p > 0.05), and no significant difference between exercise groups (p > 0.05). The 6 s group increased peak power output by 9.0% (from 1092 ± 263 W to 1181 ± 248 W; p < 0.05) from sprint session 1 to 6, and the 30 s group by 20.0% (1041 ± 161 W to 1237 ± 159 W; p < 0.05).ConclusionsThis study indicates that both 6 and 30 s bouts of repeated sprint exercise, matched for total sprint duration and W:R can improve athletic performance.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1034-1038
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Volume20
Issue number11
Early online date31 Mar 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2017

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Randomized Controlled Trials
Education
Athletic Performance
Research Design
High-Intensity Interval Training

Keywords

  • HIIT
  • Time-trial
  • Cycling
  • Exercise
  • Athletic

Cite this

Impact of time and work:rest ratio matched sprint interval training programmes on performance : A randomised controlled trial. / Lloyd Jones, Molly C.; Morris, Martyn; Jakeman, John R.

In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Vol. 20, No. 11, 11.2017, p. 1034-1038.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to examine the effects of a short training intervention using two repeated sprint protocols matched for total sprint duration and work:rest ratio.DesignRandomised-controlled trial.MethodsThirty physically active males were randomly allocated to one of two sprint training groups: a 6 s group, a 30 s group or a non-exercising control. The training groups were matched for work:rest ratio and total sprint time per session, and completed 6 training sessions over a 2-week period. Before and after the 2 week training period, participants completed a VO2max test and a 10 km time trial on a cycle ergometer.ResultsTime trial performance increased significantly by 5.1{\%} in 6 s (630 ± 115 s to 598 ± 92 s; p < 0.05) and 6.2{\%} in 30 s (579 ± 68 s to 543 ± 85 s; p < 0.05) from baseline testing, but there was no significant change in the control group (p > 0.05), and no significant difference between exercise groups (p > 0.05). The 6 s group increased peak power output by 9.0{\%} (from 1092 ± 263 W to 1181 ± 248 W; p < 0.05) from sprint session 1 to 6, and the 30 s group by 20.0{\%} (1041 ± 161 W to 1237 ± 159 W; p < 0.05).ConclusionsThis study indicates that both 6 and 30 s bouts of repeated sprint exercise, matched for total sprint duration and W:R can improve athletic performance.",
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N2 - ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to examine the effects of a short training intervention using two repeated sprint protocols matched for total sprint duration and work:rest ratio.DesignRandomised-controlled trial.MethodsThirty physically active males were randomly allocated to one of two sprint training groups: a 6 s group, a 30 s group or a non-exercising control. The training groups were matched for work:rest ratio and total sprint time per session, and completed 6 training sessions over a 2-week period. Before and after the 2 week training period, participants completed a VO2max test and a 10 km time trial on a cycle ergometer.ResultsTime trial performance increased significantly by 5.1% in 6 s (630 ± 115 s to 598 ± 92 s; p < 0.05) and 6.2% in 30 s (579 ± 68 s to 543 ± 85 s; p < 0.05) from baseline testing, but there was no significant change in the control group (p > 0.05), and no significant difference between exercise groups (p > 0.05). The 6 s group increased peak power output by 9.0% (from 1092 ± 263 W to 1181 ± 248 W; p < 0.05) from sprint session 1 to 6, and the 30 s group by 20.0% (1041 ± 161 W to 1237 ± 159 W; p < 0.05).ConclusionsThis study indicates that both 6 and 30 s bouts of repeated sprint exercise, matched for total sprint duration and W:R can improve athletic performance.

AB - ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to examine the effects of a short training intervention using two repeated sprint protocols matched for total sprint duration and work:rest ratio.DesignRandomised-controlled trial.MethodsThirty physically active males were randomly allocated to one of two sprint training groups: a 6 s group, a 30 s group or a non-exercising control. The training groups were matched for work:rest ratio and total sprint time per session, and completed 6 training sessions over a 2-week period. Before and after the 2 week training period, participants completed a VO2max test and a 10 km time trial on a cycle ergometer.ResultsTime trial performance increased significantly by 5.1% in 6 s (630 ± 115 s to 598 ± 92 s; p < 0.05) and 6.2% in 30 s (579 ± 68 s to 543 ± 85 s; p < 0.05) from baseline testing, but there was no significant change in the control group (p > 0.05), and no significant difference between exercise groups (p > 0.05). The 6 s group increased peak power output by 9.0% (from 1092 ± 263 W to 1181 ± 248 W; p < 0.05) from sprint session 1 to 6, and the 30 s group by 20.0% (1041 ± 161 W to 1237 ± 159 W; p < 0.05).ConclusionsThis study indicates that both 6 and 30 s bouts of repeated sprint exercise, matched for total sprint duration and W:R can improve athletic performance.

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