Identifying potential problems with intermittent self-catheterisation in patients with neurological conditions

Alison Bardsley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) is common in patients with neurological conditions and can result in loss of voluntary control and a bladder that cannot empty fully or at all. LUTD causes urinary frequency, urgency and incontinence and can have a significant impact on an individual’s quality of life as well as presenting a significant risk of damage to the upper renal tract due to urine backflow. Intermittent catheterisation (IC) is the insertion and removal of a catheter several times a day to ensure that the bladder is emptied. Intermittent self-catheterisation (ISC) is the preferred option for the management of residual urine resulting from lower urinary tract dysfunction. ISC is not without risk of potential complications, although these can be reduced by effective and timely patient education
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)185-191
Number of pages7
JournalBritish Journal of Neuroscience Nursing
Volume12
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Bibliographical note

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Keywords

  • Neurogenic bladder dysfunction
  • Intermittent catheterisation
  • Potential complications
  • Neurological conditions
  • Patient education

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