Identifying individual enablers and barriers to the use of digital technology for the self-management of long-term conditions by older adults

Louise Moody, Esmé Wood, Abigail Needham, Andrew Booth, Angel Jimenez-Aranda, Wendy Tindale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Evidence suggests that much of the digital technology available and provided to older adults to enable self-management of long-term conditions is under-utilised. This research focuses on three conditions prevalent amongst older adults: diabetes, dementia and chronic kidney disease, and explores the individual enablers and barriers to the use of digital self-management technology. The paper reports findings from a series of three systematic reviews of qualitative research (qualitative evidence syntheses). These reviews informed the design of a Delphi study. The first round of the Delphi involving 15 expert interviews is reported. The findings highlight common themes across the three conditions: how technology is used; barriers to use; assessing individual needs when selecting technology; support requirements; multi-functional self-management technologies; trust, privacy and data sharing; achieving accessible and aspirational design. Some emerging recommendations have been suggested to guide the design, and provision of technology to older adults. These will extended and refined through subsequent rounds of the Delphi method.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)(In-Press)
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Medical Engineering and Technology
Volume(In-Press)
Early online date24 Jun 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 24 Jun 2022

Bibliographical note

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Funder

NIHR

Keywords

  • Technology use
  • chronic kidney disease
  • dementia
  • diabetes
  • user acceptance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Identifying individual enablers and barriers to the use of digital technology for the self-management of long-term conditions by older adults'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this