Human Rights and the Commons: Exploring Approaches to the Governance of Land and Natural Resources beyond Indigenous Peoples’ Rights. The Case of Peasants

Stefania Errico, Priscilla Claeys

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Worldwide, 2.5 billion people today depend on lands managed through customary,
community-based tenure systems. Although land and natural resources are recognizedas essential elements for the realization of many human rights, international human rights law does not recognize a human right to land, with the exception of theinstruments on indigenous peoples’ rights and the recently adopted UN draft Declaration on the Rights of Peasants and other people working in rural areas (UNDROP). The article explores the governance of land and natural resources beyond the case of indigenous peoples' rights, proposing a combined approach based on human rights and collective action theory. To this end, it focuses on the specific case of the UNDROP with the objective of illustrating the potential of making use of both the human rights and collective action approach to ensure the social and environmental ‘viability’ of the commons.
LanguageEnglish
Pages(In-press)
JournalInternational Journal on Minority and Group Rights
Volume(In-press)
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 31 Jan 2019

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peasant
natural resources
human rights
governance
collective behavior
action theory
UNO
rural area
Law
community

Keywords

  • human rights
  • indigenous peoples
  • Peasants
  • Commons
  • Land access
  • Natural Resources

Cite this

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title = "Human Rights and the Commons: Exploring Approaches to the Governance of Land and Natural Resources beyond Indigenous Peoples’ Rights. The Case of Peasants",
abstract = "Worldwide, 2.5 billion people today depend on lands managed through customary,community-based tenure systems. Although land and natural resources are recognizedas essential elements for the realization of many human rights, international human rights law does not recognize a human right to land, with the exception of theinstruments on indigenous peoples’ rights and the recently adopted UN draft Declaration on the Rights of Peasants and other people working in rural areas (UNDROP). The article explores the governance of land and natural resources beyond the case of indigenous peoples' rights, proposing a combined approach based on human rights and collective action theory. To this end, it focuses on the specific case of the UNDROP with the objective of illustrating the potential of making use of both the human rights and collective action approach to ensure the social and environmental ‘viability’ of the commons.",
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AB - Worldwide, 2.5 billion people today depend on lands managed through customary,community-based tenure systems. Although land and natural resources are recognizedas essential elements for the realization of many human rights, international human rights law does not recognize a human right to land, with the exception of theinstruments on indigenous peoples’ rights and the recently adopted UN draft Declaration on the Rights of Peasants and other people working in rural areas (UNDROP). The article explores the governance of land and natural resources beyond the case of indigenous peoples' rights, proposing a combined approach based on human rights and collective action theory. To this end, it focuses on the specific case of the UNDROP with the objective of illustrating the potential of making use of both the human rights and collective action approach to ensure the social and environmental ‘viability’ of the commons.

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KW - Land access

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