How Voluntary? The Role of Community in Youth Participation in Muslim Mindanao

Alpaslan Ozerdem, Sukanya Podder

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Three major insurgent groups have waged armed struggle against the forces of the Philippine military since the 1960s. These are the communist-oriented New People’s Army (NPA), the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) and its breakaway faction, the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF). The latter two groups were organized by Muslim revolutionary leaders, convinced that armed struggle is the only way to express the right to self-determination for the Bangsamoro Muslims in Mindanao. Late in the 1980s, a group of ragtag armed youth, mostly from the Yakan and Sama ethnic groups based on the island province of Basilan emerged to become the country’s foremost bandit and kidnap-for-ransom group. The group, known as the Abu Sayyaf (‘Bearer of the Sword’) has lately been reported to have recruited several minors into their fold.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationChild Soldiers
Subtitle of host publicationFrom Recruitment to Reintegration
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Pages122-138
Number of pages17
ISBN (Electronic)9780230342927
ISBN (Print)9781349317622
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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Ozerdem, A., & Podder, S. (2011). How Voluntary? The Role of Community in Youth Participation in Muslim Mindanao. In Child Soldiers: From Recruitment to Reintegration (pp. 122-138). Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230342927_7