How Can Gender Smart Mobility Become a More Intersectional Form of Mobility Justice?

J.A. Bridgman, Andree Woodcock, Kat Gut

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceedingpeer-review

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Abstract

Central discussions arguing the advancement of women and transport, as both users of and employed within the sector, have not really advanced in the past 20 years. While numerous tools have been put in place to support women’s participation in the transport labour market, the figure remains low, with women only accounting for 22% of the workforce in the European Union. Women’s mobility patterns have also not changed significantly over time, their journeys are still shorter and more complicated than those of men as a result of socio-cultural norms. To improve opportunities and outcomes Gender Mainstreaming has been adopted as an objective of transport policy in Europe but adoption on a country level has been fragmented. Mobility needs are evolving, Gender relevant aspects of a smart city, mobility, safety and security, employment and sustainability have already been identified as fields of action in previous research however whilst Smart Mobility is advancing choice and offering more sustainable modes of transport it is not clear whether these advancements will be advantageous to all groups in society.
This paper discusses ethical issues relating to equity in mobility with a focus on intersections of gender, race and class. We relate how unequal access to space in the context of smart mobility increases vulnerability to social exclusion related transport poverty and discuss how incorporating the theory of intersectionality into transport policy can build on advancements already made through the adoption of gender mainstreaming. Our discussion of the operationalization of intersectionality in smart mobility is a timely one in the era of COVID-19. Emerging evidence shows the effects of the pandemic are gendered and has exposed deep structural inequalities in society, particularly for women, BAME (Black and Minority Ethnic) communities and lowincome households. The ongoing pandemic crisis could potentially set back women’s progress in the labour market and has also had a significant impact on the transport sector. In the face of economic downturn, the post COVID-19 landscape could also
TDM 2021 17th – 19th of November 2021
10th International Symposium on Travel Demand Management jointly with TInnGO and DIAMOND final conference 92
encourage modal shift as we seek safer and more sustainable forms of transport. This must become a catalyst for more equitable and sustainable smart mobility.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Travel Demand Management TDM Symposium 2021
Subtitle of host publicationGender and Equality in Transport
EditorsMaria Chiara Leva, Augustus Ababio-Donkor , Ajeni Thimnu , Wafaa Saleh
Pages91-92
Number of pages2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Nov 2022
Event10th International Symposium on Travel Demand Management jointly with TInnGO and DIAMOND final conference -
Duration: 17 Nov 202119 Nov 2021
https://arrow.tudublin.ie/schfsehbk/11

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Travel Demand Management (TDM) Symposium
PublisherTechnological University Dublin
Volume11
ISSN (Electronic)2811-5341

Conference

Conference10th International Symposium on Travel Demand Management jointly with TInnGO and DIAMOND final conference
Period17/11/2119/11/21
Internet address

Bibliographical note

Available under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike 4.0 International Licence

Keywords

  • Intersectionality
  • mobility justice
  • transport poverty
  • smart mobility
  • social exclusion

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