Hierarchically structured titanium foams for tissue scaffold applications

R. Singh, P.D. Lee, J.R. Jones, G. Poologasundarampillai, T. Post, T.C. Lindley, R.J. Dashwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present a novel route for producing a new class of titanium foams for use in biomedical implant applications. These foams are hierarchically porous, with both the traditional large (>300 μm) highly interconnected pores and, uniquely, wall struts also containing micron scale (0.5–5 μm) interconnected porosities. The fabrication method consists of first producing a porous oxide precursor via a gel casting method, followed by electrochemical reduction to produce a metallic foam. This method offers the unique ability to tailor the porosity at several scales independently, unlike traditional space-holder techniques. Reducing the pressure during foam setting increased the macro-pore size. The intra-strut pore size (and percentage) can be controlled independently of macro-pore size by altering the ceramic loading and sintering temperature during precursor production. Typical properties for an 80% porous Ti foam were a modulus of ∼1 GPa, a yield strength of 8 MPa and a permeability of 350 Darcies, all of which are in the range required for biomedical implant applications. We also demonstrate that the micron scale intra-strut porosities can be exploited to allow infiltration of bioactive materials using a novel bioactive silica–polymer composite, resulting in a metal–bioactive silica–polymer composite.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4596-4604
Number of pages9
JournalActa Biomaterialia
Volume6
Issue number12
Early online date30 Jun 2010
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2010

Fingerprint

Tissue Scaffolds
Porosity
Titanium
Foams
Struts
Pore size
Ceramics
Macros
Oxides
Permeability
Gels
Composite materials
Pressure
Temperature
Infiltration
Yield stress
Casting
Sintering
Fabrication

Keywords

  • Hierarchical titanium foams
  • Biomedical implants
  • Molten salt electrolysis
  • X-ray microtomography
  • Spinal fusion

Cite this

Singh, R., Lee, P. D., Jones, J. R., Poologasundarampillai, G., Post, T., Lindley, T. C., & Dashwood, R. J. (2010). Hierarchically structured titanium foams for tissue scaffold applications. Acta Biomaterialia, 6(12), 4596-4604. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2010.06.027

Hierarchically structured titanium foams for tissue scaffold applications. / Singh, R.; Lee, P.D.; Jones, J.R.; Poologasundarampillai, G.; Post, T.; Lindley, T.C.; Dashwood, R.J.

In: Acta Biomaterialia, Vol. 6, No. 12, 12.2010, p. 4596-4604.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Singh, R, Lee, PD, Jones, JR, Poologasundarampillai, G, Post, T, Lindley, TC & Dashwood, RJ 2010, 'Hierarchically structured titanium foams for tissue scaffold applications' Acta Biomaterialia, vol. 6, no. 12, pp. 4596-4604. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2010.06.027
Singh R, Lee PD, Jones JR, Poologasundarampillai G, Post T, Lindley TC et al. Hierarchically structured titanium foams for tissue scaffold applications. Acta Biomaterialia. 2010 Dec;6(12):4596-4604. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2010.06.027
Singh, R. ; Lee, P.D. ; Jones, J.R. ; Poologasundarampillai, G. ; Post, T. ; Lindley, T.C. ; Dashwood, R.J. / Hierarchically structured titanium foams for tissue scaffold applications. In: Acta Biomaterialia. 2010 ; Vol. 6, No. 12. pp. 4596-4604.
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