Hemodynamic Instability during Dialysis: The Potential Role of Intradialytic Exercise

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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Abstract

Acute haemodynamic instability is a natural consequence of disordered cardiovascular physiology during haemodialysis (HD). Prevalence of intradialytic hypotension (IDH) can be as high as 20-30%, contributing to subclinical, transient myocardial ischemia. In the long term, this results in progressive, maladaptive cardiac remodeling and impairment of left ventricular function. This is thought to be a major contributor to increased cardiovascular mortality in end stage renal disease (ESRD). Medical strategies to acutely attenuate haemodynamic instability during HD are suboptimal. Whilst a programme of intradialytic exercise training appears to facilitate numerous chronic adaptations, little is known of the acute physiological response to this type of exercise. In particular, the potential for intradialytic exercise to acutely stabilise cardiovascular hemodynamics, thus preventing IDH and myocardial ischemia, has not been explored. This narrative review aims to summarise the characteristics and causes of acute haemodynamic instability during HD, with an overview of current medical therapies to treat IDH. Moreover, we discuss the acute physiological response to intradialytic exercise with a view to determining the potential for this nonmedical intervention to stabilise cardiovascular haemodynamics during HD, improve coronary perfusion, and reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in ESRD.

LanguageEnglish
Article number8276912
Pages8276912
Number of pages11
JournalBioMed Research International
Volume2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Feb 2018

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Dialysis
Hemodynamics
Renal Dialysis
Hypotension
Chronic Kidney Failure
Myocardial Ischemia
Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena
Mortality
Physiology
Left Ventricular Function
Perfusion
Exercise
Morbidity

Bibliographical note

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Cite this

Hemodynamic Instability during Dialysis : The Potential Role of Intradialytic Exercise. / McGuire, Scott; Horton, Elizabeth Jane; Renshaw, Derek; Jimenez, Alofonso; Krishnan, Nithya; McGregor, Gordon.

In: BioMed Research International, Vol. 2018, 8276912, 27.02.2018, p. 8276912.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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