Global disease burden attributed to low physical activity in 204 countries and territories from 1990 to 2019: Insights from the Global Burden of Disease 2019 Study

Achraf Ammar, Khaled Trabelsi, Souhail Hermassi, Ali Asghar Kolahi, Mohammad Ali Mansournia, Haitham Jahrami, Omar Boukhris, Mohamed Ali Boujelbane, Jordan M. Glenn, Cain C.T. Clark, Aria Nejadghaderi, Luca Puce, Saeid Safiri, Hamdi Chtourou, Wolfgang I. Schöllhorn, Piotr Zmijewski, Nicola Luigi Bragazzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

The purpose of this investigation is to estimate the global disease burden attributable to low physical activity (PA) in 204 countries and territories from 1990 to 2019 by age, sex, and Socio-Demographic Index (SDI). Detailed information on global deaths and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) attributable to low PA were collected from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019. The ideal exposure scenario of PA was defined as 3000-4500 metabolic equivalent minutes per week and low PA was considered to be less than this threshold. Age-standardization was used to improve the comparison of rates across locations or between time periods. In 2019, low PA seems to contribute to 0.83 million [95% uncertainty interval (UI) 0.43 to 1.47] deaths and 15.75 million (95% UI 8.52 to 28.62) DALYs globally, an increase of 83.9% (95% UI 69.3 to 105.7) and 82.9% (95% UI 65.5 to 112.1) since 1990, respectively. The age-standardized rates of low-PA-related deaths and DALYs per 100,000 people in 2019 were 11.1 (95% UI 5.7 to 19.5) and 198.4 (95% UI 108.2 to 360.3), respectively. Of all age-standardized DALYs globally in 2019, 0.6% (95% UI 0.3 to 1.1) may be attributable to low PA. The association between SDI and the proportion of age-standardized DALYs attributable to low PA suggests that regions with the highest SDI largely decreased their proportions of age-standardized DALYs attributable to low PA during 1990-2019, while other regions tended to have increased proportions in the same timeframe. In 2019, the rates of low-PA-related deaths and DALYs tended to rise with increasing age in both sexes, with no differences between males and females in the age-standardized rates. An insufficient accumulation of PA across the globe occurs together with a considerable public health burden. Health initiatives to promote PA within different age groups and countries are urgently needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)835-855
Number of pages21
JournalBiology of Sport
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Nov 2022

Bibliographical note

Copyright: © Institute of Sport – National Research Instutite. All articles are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/), allowing third parties to copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format and remix, transform, and build upon the material for any purpose, even commercially, provided the original work is properly cited and states its license.

Funder

The GBD 2019 study was funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The present study was also funded by Hunan Youth Talent Project (2019RS2014) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (81800393). However, the funders were not involved in any way in the preparation of this manuscript. We thank all members of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), University of Washington, and all collaborators involved in GBD 2019 study.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 Institute of Sport. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Death rates
  • Disability-adjusted life years
  • Global burden of disease
  • Physical inactivity
  • Public Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Physiology (medical)

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