Gender influences on the work-related stress-coping process

Sarah Watson, Yong Wah Goh, Sukanlaya Sawang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)
48 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The increasing incidence of occupational stress is recognized as a global phenomenon that is having a detrimental impact on both individuals and organizations. This study aims to identify whether men and women adopt different stress and coping processes when subjected to stress in a work context. A total of 258 workers of various professions (males = 106, females = 152) participated in the study. Results indicated that men and women differ in their stress and coping processes, forming two very distinct groups and adopting specific process models when encountering a stressful situation at work. Limitations and implications from this study are discussed.

Publisher Statement: This article does not exactly replicate the final version published in the journal Journal of Individual Differences. It is not a copy of the original published article and is not suitable for citation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)39-46
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Individual Differences
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Bibliographical note

This article does not exactly replicate the final version published in the journal Journal of Individual Differences. It is not a copy of the original published article and is not suitable for citation.

Keywords

  • Occupational Stress
  • Well-being
  • Secondary Appraisal
  • Primary Appraisal
  • Gender Difference

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