Fundamental movement skills and perceived competence, but not fitness, are the key factors associated with technical skill performance in boys who play grassroots soccer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: This study examined the association between fitness, fundamental movement skills (FMS) and perceived competence on technical skills in boys engaged in grassroots soccer. Methods: Sixty boys (8-12 years of age, Mean ± SD = 10 ± 1 years) undertook assessment of FMS, perceived competence, physical fitness (15m sprint speed, standing long jump distance and seated 1kg medicine ball throw as a composite z-score) and technical skills (dribbling, passing and shooting as a composite z-score).Results: Multiple backwards linear regression was used to determine to amount of variance in technical skill explained by FMS, perceived competence and fitness. Results indicated a significant model (F 3,58= 42.04, P =.0001, Adj R2 =.680) which explained 68% of the variance in technical skills. Perceived competence (β=.316, P =.001), Total FMS (β=.140, P =.002), and chronological age (β=.863), P =.001) significantly contributed to the model. Conclusion:This study demonstrates that better technical skills (passing, dribbling, shooting) in youth soccer are explained, alongside age, by being competent in FMS and having a more positive perception of competence. Coaches should therefore seek to encourage development of these factors during childhood for the benefit of technical skill performance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)(In-Press)
JournalScience and Medicine in Football
Volume(In-Press)
Early online date7 Apr 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 7 Apr 2021

Keywords

  • motor competence
  • children
  • grassroots
  • passing
  • dribbling
  • shooting
  • Motor competence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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