From “Sad People on Bridges” to “Kidnap and Extortion”: Understanding the Nature and Situational Characteristics of Hostage and Crisis Negotiator Deployments

Amy Grubb, Sarah Brown, Peter Hall, Erica Bowen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)
5 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Hostage and crisis negotiation is well established as a police tool, and there is a growing body of literature that provides academic insight into the phenomenon. Academics have developed a corpus of literature to explain the way negotiators operate or how they can resolve incidents successfully. Whilst research in this area has originated from various countries and addressed negotiation from a variety of perspectives, there is limited research that has focused specifically on negotiation from an Anglo-centric perspective. This article presents the findings from a detailed academic examination of negotiator experiences in England, whereby semistructured interviews were conducted with 15 negotiators from nine forces. Analysis using grounded theory revealed 12 deployment categories, situated within a recurring context involving subjects experiencing personal, emotional, or psychological crisis. These categories can be used to enhance our understanding of negotiator deployment in England and are discussed with reference to the implications for negotiator training and practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-65
Number of pages25
JournalNegotiation and Conflict Management Research
Volume12
Issue number1
Early online date19 Jun 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2019

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extortion
Law enforcement
grounded theory
incident
police
examination
interview
Hostage
Nature
Extortion
experience
England

Bibliographical note

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Grubb, A, Brown, S, Hall, P & Bowen, E 2018, 'From “Sad People on Bridges” To “Kidnap and Extortion”: Understanding the Nature and Situational Characteristics of Hostage Crisis Negotiator Deployments' Negotiation and Conflict Management Research, vol (In-Press), pp. (In-Press)., which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

Keywords

  • categories of hostage and crisis negotiator deployment
  • characteristics of hostage and crisis negotiation
  • crisis negotiation
  • hostage and crisis negotiation
  • police negotiation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

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