Formal design of SMIL presentations

R.M. Newman, E.I. Gaura

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

SMIL (Synchronised Multimedia Integration Language) is an XML language for the distribution of synchronised video, sound and other media in presentations, and is likely to be the preferred format for distribution of multimedia presentations that include synchronised and streamed media. Previous work has argued that conventional hypermedia design methods provide insufficient design rigour to allow their use with confidence for safety and mission critical applications. It was shown how formal methods, derived from the theory of computer science, could be applied to the design of hypermedia presentations to provide a rigorous design technique. Two limitations of this work are discussed. The first is its restriction to closed systems. Although it was argued that most safety critical hypermedia systems are closed, this is not the case with many 'mission critical' applications, particularly those in e-business. The second limitation is the application of the technique to a relatively small number of media. Again, safety critical applications tend to be conservative in their use of media, but it would be advantageous for many other application areas if this constraint were not there. This paper discusses how this work may be extended in two key areas to remove these limitations. The first allows the method to be used the design of SMIL presentations, providing a means of rigorous design for synchronised and streamed media, necessary in these media are to be used in safety and mission critical applications, and is achieved by a detailed extension of the underlying models on which the method is based to cover the operation of SMIL. Copyright 2003 ACM.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationACM Special Interest Group for Design of Communications
EditorsS.B. Jones, D.G. Novick
Pages113-116
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 2003
EventACM Special Interest Group for Design of Communications - San Francisco, United States
Duration: 12 Oct 200315 Oct 2003
http://www.sigdoc2003.cs.uvic.ca/

Conference

ConferenceACM Special Interest Group for Design of Communications
Abbreviated titleSIGDOC 2003
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco
Period12/10/0315/10/03
Internet address

Fingerprint

Hypermedia systems
Formal methods
XML
Computer science
Acoustic waves
Industry

Keywords

  • Formal methods
  • Hypermedia design
  • Streamed media
  • Synchronized multimedia integration language (SMIL), Computer science
  • Electronic commerce
  • HTML
  • Hypermedia systems
  • Mathematical models
  • Motivation
  • Multimedia systems
  • Synchronization, XML

Cite this

Newman, R. M., & Gaura, E. I. (2003). Formal design of SMIL presentations. In S. B. Jones, & D. G. Novick (Eds.), ACM Special Interest Group for Design of Communications (pp. 113-116)

Formal design of SMIL presentations. / Newman, R.M.; Gaura, E.I.

ACM Special Interest Group for Design of Communications. ed. / S.B. Jones; D.G. Novick. 2003. p. 113-116.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

Newman, RM & Gaura, EI 2003, Formal design of SMIL presentations. in SB Jones & DG Novick (eds), ACM Special Interest Group for Design of Communications. pp. 113-116, ACM Special Interest Group for Design of Communications, San Francisco, United States, 12/10/03.
Newman RM, Gaura EI. Formal design of SMIL presentations. In Jones SB, Novick DG, editors, ACM Special Interest Group for Design of Communications. 2003. p. 113-116
Newman, R.M. ; Gaura, E.I. / Formal design of SMIL presentations. ACM Special Interest Group for Design of Communications. editor / S.B. Jones ; D.G. Novick. 2003. pp. 113-116
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