Evidence of concurrent and prospective associations between facial affect recognition accuracy and children's involvement in antisocial behaviour

Erica Bowen, L. Dixon

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    11 Citations (Scopus)
    8 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    This study examined the concurrent and prospective associations between children's ability to accurately recognize facial affect at age 8.5 and antisocial behavior at age 8.5 and 10.5 years in a sub sample of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children cohort (5,396 children; 2,644, 49% males). All observed effects were small. It was found that at age 8.5 years, in contrast to nonantisocial children; antisocial children were less accurate at decoding happy and sad expressions when presented at low intensity. In addition, concurrent antisocial behavior was associated with misidentifying expressions of fear as expressions of sadness. In longitudinal analyses, children who misidentified fear as anger exhibited a decreased risk of antisocial behavior 2 years later. The study suggests that concurrent rather than future antisocial behavior is associated with facial affect recognition accuracy
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)305-314
    JournalAggressive Behaviour
    Volume36
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2010

    Keywords

    • antisocial behavior
    • emotion recognition
    • longitudinal study

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