Everyday sexuality and identity: de-differentiating the sexual self in social work

Priscilla Dunk-West

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    4 Citations (Scopus)
    9 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Sexuality and sexual identity have been relatively marginalized areas in both social work education and practice. However, changes in policy and legislation in the UK and other countries over the past decade have brought discussions of sexuality into the mainstream public service agenda. In social work and social care, gay and lesbian citizenship rights have been explicitly recognised. In the fields of adoption and fostering new regulations and guidance have helped improve and develop practice around assessment and intervention. It remains the case, however, that sex is often perceived as a problem area within social work and social care, discussed only in relation to sexually diverse communities or in the realm of dysfunction or pathology.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationSexual Identities and Sexuality in Social Work
    EditorsPriscilla Dunk-West, Trish Hafford-Letchfield
    Place of PublicationFarnham
    PublisherAshgate
    Pages177-192
    ISBN (Print)9780754678823
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2011

    Fingerprint

    sexuality
    social work
    pathology
    public service
    citizenship
    legislation
    regulation
    community
    education

    Bibliographical note

    Used by permission of the Publishers from Everyday sexuality and identity: de-differentiating the sexual self in social work, in Sexual Identities and Sexuality in Social Work eds. Priscilla Dunk-West and Trish Hafford-Letchfield (Farnham: Ashgate, 2011), pp. 177-192. Copyright © 2011

    Keywords

    • sexual identity
    • social work
    • sexuality

    Cite this

    Dunk-West, P. (2011). Everyday sexuality and identity: de-differentiating the sexual self in social work. In P. Dunk-West, & T. Hafford-Letchfield (Eds.), Sexual Identities and Sexuality in Social Work (pp. 177-192). Farnham: Ashgate.

    Everyday sexuality and identity: de-differentiating the sexual self in social work. / Dunk-West, Priscilla.

    Sexual Identities and Sexuality in Social Work. ed. / Priscilla Dunk-West; Trish Hafford-Letchfield. Farnham : Ashgate, 2011. p. 177-192.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Dunk-West, P 2011, Everyday sexuality and identity: de-differentiating the sexual self in social work. in P Dunk-West & T Hafford-Letchfield (eds), Sexual Identities and Sexuality in Social Work. Ashgate, Farnham, pp. 177-192.
    Dunk-West P. Everyday sexuality and identity: de-differentiating the sexual self in social work. In Dunk-West P, Hafford-Letchfield T, editors, Sexual Identities and Sexuality in Social Work. Farnham: Ashgate. 2011. p. 177-192
    Dunk-West, Priscilla. / Everyday sexuality and identity: de-differentiating the sexual self in social work. Sexual Identities and Sexuality in Social Work. editor / Priscilla Dunk-West ; Trish Hafford-Letchfield. Farnham : Ashgate, 2011. pp. 177-192
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