Erasing in the algorithmic extreme: Mimi Cabell and Jason Huff’s 'American Psycho'

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In 2012 Google faced a privacy lawsuit over accessing users’ data and disclosing it to advertisers without permission. The accusations of breach of contract and fraud presented Google’s practices as illegal wiretapping. [1] The claims followed a change in policy Google introduced on March 1, 2012, and were filed as a national class action. Before March 2012, individual privacy policies existed for each of Google’s products. [2] But the new policy treats each of Google’s users as a single entity, across all services, as a result giving the company the right to combine information from multiple sources.
Original languageEnglish
JournalMedia-N
Volume11
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

search engine
privacy
lawsuit
fraud

Keywords

  • Mimi Cabell
  • Jason Huff
  • Bret Easton Ellis
  • American Psycho
  • erasure
  • algorithm
  • user profiling
  • targeted advertising
  • algorithmic criticism
  • Google

Cite this

Erasing in the algorithmic extreme: Mimi Cabell and Jason Huff’s 'American Psycho'. / Marczewska, Kaja.

In: Media-N, Vol. 11, No. 1, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{8a6fb044acef4030a38c981ff5906735,
title = "Erasing in the algorithmic extreme: Mimi Cabell and Jason Huff’s 'American Psycho'",
abstract = "In 2012 Google faced a privacy lawsuit over accessing users’ data and disclosing it to advertisers without permission. The accusations of breach of contract and fraud presented Google’s practices as illegal wiretapping. [1] The claims followed a change in policy Google introduced on March 1, 2012, and were filed as a national class action. Before March 2012, individual privacy policies existed for each of Google’s products. [2] But the new policy treats each of Google’s users as a single entity, across all services, as a result giving the company the right to combine information from multiple sources.",
keywords = "Mimi Cabell, Jason Huff, Bret Easton Ellis, American Psycho, erasure, algorithm, user profiling, targeted advertising, algorithmic criticism, Google",
author = "Kaja Marczewska",
year = "2015",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
journal = "Media-N",
issn = "1942-017X",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Erasing in the algorithmic extreme: Mimi Cabell and Jason Huff’s 'American Psycho'

AU - Marczewska, Kaja

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - In 2012 Google faced a privacy lawsuit over accessing users’ data and disclosing it to advertisers without permission. The accusations of breach of contract and fraud presented Google’s practices as illegal wiretapping. [1] The claims followed a change in policy Google introduced on March 1, 2012, and were filed as a national class action. Before March 2012, individual privacy policies existed for each of Google’s products. [2] But the new policy treats each of Google’s users as a single entity, across all services, as a result giving the company the right to combine information from multiple sources.

AB - In 2012 Google faced a privacy lawsuit over accessing users’ data and disclosing it to advertisers without permission. The accusations of breach of contract and fraud presented Google’s practices as illegal wiretapping. [1] The claims followed a change in policy Google introduced on March 1, 2012, and were filed as a national class action. Before March 2012, individual privacy policies existed for each of Google’s products. [2] But the new policy treats each of Google’s users as a single entity, across all services, as a result giving the company the right to combine information from multiple sources.

KW - Mimi Cabell

KW - Jason Huff

KW - Bret Easton Ellis

KW - American Psycho

KW - erasure

KW - algorithm

KW - user profiling

KW - targeted advertising

KW - algorithmic criticism

KW - Google

M3 - Article

VL - 11

JO - Media-N

JF - Media-N

SN - 1942-017X

IS - 1

ER -