Enhancing nurse satisfaction: an exploration of specialty nurse shortage within the West Midlands region of NHS England Nursing Management

Karl Shutes, Keith Gray, Rebecca Wilde

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim This article offers nurse managers guidance on analysing, managing and addressing a potentially dissatisfied nursing workforce, focusing on three priority shortage specialties: emergency care, paediatrics and cardiology. The aim of the study was to explore to what extent registered nurses and healthcare assistants, referred to collectively here as ‘nursing staff’, are satisfied with teamworking opportunities, continuing professional development (CPD) opportunities and workplace autonomy.
Method A survey questionnaire was developed to evaluate three derived determinants of nurse satisfaction: team working, CPD and autonomy. The NHS West Midlands region was the focus given that it is among the poorest performing regions outside London in filling nursing posts.
Findings Overall, nursing staff respondents were satisfied with teamworking, CPD and autonomy, which challenges the perception that nurses in NHS England are dissatisfied with these satisfaction determinants. The findings give a complex picture of nurse satisfaction; for example a large minority of respondents were dissatisfied with their ability to carry out duties as they see fit.
Conclusion When developing management systems to investigate, manage and enhance nurse satisfaction, nurse managers must recognise the complexity and subtleties of determining factors. This will increase as nursing becomes more specialised. Subsequently, nurse managers need to work closely with staff at higher education institutions and other professional agencies to commission appropriate professional development.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)26-33
Number of pages7
JournalNursing Management
Volume25
Issue number1
Early online date20 Mar 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Mar 2018

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England
Nursing
Nurse Administrators
Nurses
Professional Autonomy
Nursing Staff
Allied Health Personnel
Aptitude
Emergency Medical Services
Cardiology
Workplace
Pediatrics
Education
Surveys and Questionnaires

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Enhancing nurse satisfaction: an exploration of specialty nurse shortage within the West Midlands region of NHS England Nursing Management. / Shutes, Karl; Gray, Keith; Wilde, Rebecca.

In: Nursing Management, Vol. 25, No. 1, 22.03.2018, p. 26-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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