Effects of sodium bicarbonate ingestion on prolonged intermittent exercise

Mike Price, Paul Moss, Stuart Rance

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    63 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of sodium bicarbonate ingestion on prolonged intermittent exercise and performance. Methods: Eight healthy male subjects (mean ± SD: age 25.4 ± 6.4 yr, mass 70.9 ± 5.1 kg, height 179 ± 7 cm, VO2max 4.21 ± 0.51 L·min-1) volunteered for the study, which had received ethical approval. Subjects undertook two 30-min intermittent cycling trials (repeated 3-min blocks; 90 s at 40% VO2max, 60 s at 60% VO2max 14-s maximal sprint, 16-s rest) after ingestion of either sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3; 0.3 g·kg-1) or sodium chloride (NaCl; 0.045 g·kg-1). Expired air, blood lactate (BLa), bicarbonate (HCO3-), and pH were measured at rest, 30 and 60 min postingestion, and during the 40% VO2max component of exercise (4, 10, 16, and 29 min). Results: After ingestion, pH increased from rest to 7.46 ± 0.03 and 7.40 ± 0.01 for NaHCO3 and NaCl, respectively (main effect for time and trial; P < 0.05). Values decreased at 15 min of exercise to 7.30 ± 0.07 and 7.21 ± 0.06, respectively, remaining at similar levels until the end of exercise. BLa peaked at 15 min (12.03 ± 4.31 and 10.00 ± 2.58 mmol·L-1, for NaHCO3 and NaCl, respectively; P > 0.05) remaining elevated until the end of exercise (P < 0.05). Peak power expressed relative to sprint 1 demonstrated a significant main effect between trials (P < 0.05). Sprint 2 increased by 11.5 ± 5% and 1.8 ± 9.5% for NaHCO3 and NaCl, respectively. During NaHCO3, sprint 8 remained similar to sprint 1 (0.2 ± 17%), whereas a decrease was observed during NaCl (-10.0 ± 16.0%). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that ingestion of NaHCO3 improves sprint performance during prolonged intermittent cycling.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1303-1308
    Number of pages6
    JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
    Volume35
    Issue number8
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2003

    Fingerprint

    Sodium Bicarbonate
    Eating
    Exercise
    Bicarbonates
    Sodium Chloride
    Lactic Acid
    Healthy Volunteers
    Air

    Keywords

    • Alkalosis
    • Blood lactate
    • Peak power
    • Performance
    • PH
    • RPE

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
    • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

    Cite this

    Effects of sodium bicarbonate ingestion on prolonged intermittent exercise. / Price, Mike; Moss, Paul; Rance, Stuart.

    In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 35, No. 8, 01.08.2003, p. 1303-1308.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    abstract = "Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of sodium bicarbonate ingestion on prolonged intermittent exercise and performance. Methods: Eight healthy male subjects (mean ± SD: age 25.4 ± 6.4 yr, mass 70.9 ± 5.1 kg, height 179 ± 7 cm, VO2max 4.21 ± 0.51 L·min-1) volunteered for the study, which had received ethical approval. Subjects undertook two 30-min intermittent cycling trials (repeated 3-min blocks; 90 s at 40{\%} VO2max, 60 s at 60{\%} VO2max 14-s maximal sprint, 16-s rest) after ingestion of either sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3; 0.3 g·kg-1) or sodium chloride (NaCl; 0.045 g·kg-1). Expired air, blood lactate (BLa), bicarbonate (HCO3-), and pH were measured at rest, 30 and 60 min postingestion, and during the 40{\%} VO2max component of exercise (4, 10, 16, and 29 min). Results: After ingestion, pH increased from rest to 7.46 ± 0.03 and 7.40 ± 0.01 for NaHCO3 and NaCl, respectively (main effect for time and trial; P < 0.05). Values decreased at 15 min of exercise to 7.30 ± 0.07 and 7.21 ± 0.06, respectively, remaining at similar levels until the end of exercise. BLa peaked at 15 min (12.03 ± 4.31 and 10.00 ± 2.58 mmol·L-1, for NaHCO3 and NaCl, respectively; P > 0.05) remaining elevated until the end of exercise (P < 0.05). Peak power expressed relative to sprint 1 demonstrated a significant main effect between trials (P < 0.05). Sprint 2 increased by 11.5 ± 5{\%} and 1.8 ± 9.5{\%} for NaHCO3 and NaCl, respectively. During NaHCO3, sprint 8 remained similar to sprint 1 (0.2 ± 17{\%}), whereas a decrease was observed during NaCl (-10.0 ± 16.0{\%}). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that ingestion of NaHCO3 improves sprint performance during prolonged intermittent cycling.",
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    AU - Moss, Paul

    AU - Rance, Stuart

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    N2 - Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of sodium bicarbonate ingestion on prolonged intermittent exercise and performance. Methods: Eight healthy male subjects (mean ± SD: age 25.4 ± 6.4 yr, mass 70.9 ± 5.1 kg, height 179 ± 7 cm, VO2max 4.21 ± 0.51 L·min-1) volunteered for the study, which had received ethical approval. Subjects undertook two 30-min intermittent cycling trials (repeated 3-min blocks; 90 s at 40% VO2max, 60 s at 60% VO2max 14-s maximal sprint, 16-s rest) after ingestion of either sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3; 0.3 g·kg-1) or sodium chloride (NaCl; 0.045 g·kg-1). Expired air, blood lactate (BLa), bicarbonate (HCO3-), and pH were measured at rest, 30 and 60 min postingestion, and during the 40% VO2max component of exercise (4, 10, 16, and 29 min). Results: After ingestion, pH increased from rest to 7.46 ± 0.03 and 7.40 ± 0.01 for NaHCO3 and NaCl, respectively (main effect for time and trial; P < 0.05). Values decreased at 15 min of exercise to 7.30 ± 0.07 and 7.21 ± 0.06, respectively, remaining at similar levels until the end of exercise. BLa peaked at 15 min (12.03 ± 4.31 and 10.00 ± 2.58 mmol·L-1, for NaHCO3 and NaCl, respectively; P > 0.05) remaining elevated until the end of exercise (P < 0.05). Peak power expressed relative to sprint 1 demonstrated a significant main effect between trials (P < 0.05). Sprint 2 increased by 11.5 ± 5% and 1.8 ± 9.5% for NaHCO3 and NaCl, respectively. During NaHCO3, sprint 8 remained similar to sprint 1 (0.2 ± 17%), whereas a decrease was observed during NaCl (-10.0 ± 16.0%). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that ingestion of NaHCO3 improves sprint performance during prolonged intermittent cycling.

    AB - Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of sodium bicarbonate ingestion on prolonged intermittent exercise and performance. Methods: Eight healthy male subjects (mean ± SD: age 25.4 ± 6.4 yr, mass 70.9 ± 5.1 kg, height 179 ± 7 cm, VO2max 4.21 ± 0.51 L·min-1) volunteered for the study, which had received ethical approval. Subjects undertook two 30-min intermittent cycling trials (repeated 3-min blocks; 90 s at 40% VO2max, 60 s at 60% VO2max 14-s maximal sprint, 16-s rest) after ingestion of either sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3; 0.3 g·kg-1) or sodium chloride (NaCl; 0.045 g·kg-1). Expired air, blood lactate (BLa), bicarbonate (HCO3-), and pH were measured at rest, 30 and 60 min postingestion, and during the 40% VO2max component of exercise (4, 10, 16, and 29 min). Results: After ingestion, pH increased from rest to 7.46 ± 0.03 and 7.40 ± 0.01 for NaHCO3 and NaCl, respectively (main effect for time and trial; P < 0.05). Values decreased at 15 min of exercise to 7.30 ± 0.07 and 7.21 ± 0.06, respectively, remaining at similar levels until the end of exercise. BLa peaked at 15 min (12.03 ± 4.31 and 10.00 ± 2.58 mmol·L-1, for NaHCO3 and NaCl, respectively; P > 0.05) remaining elevated until the end of exercise (P < 0.05). Peak power expressed relative to sprint 1 demonstrated a significant main effect between trials (P < 0.05). Sprint 2 increased by 11.5 ± 5% and 1.8 ± 9.5% for NaHCO3 and NaCl, respectively. During NaHCO3, sprint 8 remained similar to sprint 1 (0.2 ± 17%), whereas a decrease was observed during NaCl (-10.0 ± 16.0%). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that ingestion of NaHCO3 improves sprint performance during prolonged intermittent cycling.

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    KW - Blood lactate

    KW - Peak power

    KW - Performance

    KW - PH

    KW - RPE

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