Effects of orthographic, morphological and semantic overlap on short-term memory for words in typical and atypical development

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    Abstract

    Little is known about implicit morphological processing in typical and atypical readers. These studies investigate this using a probe detection task with lures sharing morphological, orthographic or semantic overlap with the probe. Intermediate and advanced readers (reading ages 9;1-12;9) perform more poorly when there is more linguistic overlap. Novice readers (reading ages 5;7-8;0) were influenced only by orthographic overlap and not by semantics, indicating that use of orthographic processes typically precedes integration of semantic and morphological skills. Children with Otitis Media (repeated ear infections) had phonological awareness difficulties but performed age appropriately on the probe detection task indicating that morphological processing is not constrained by phonology. In contrast, dyslexic children’s performance reflected a failure to remember distinctions between words sharing root morphemes. Dyslexic children are sensitive to morphology but may over rely on root morphemes. This pattern differed from reading-ability matched children and children with circumscribed phonological difficulties. Publisher statement: This research was funded by a Nuffield Foundation Grant for Research and Innovation (reference EDU/40250). This project was funded by the Nuffield Foundation but the views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the Foundation. Published with license by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC© 2016 Helen L. Breadmore and Julia M. Carroll
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)471-489
    JournalScientific Studies of Reading
    Volume20
    Issue number6
    Early online date10 Nov 2016
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

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    Short-Term Memory
    Semantics
    semantics
    Reading
    Aptitude
    Otitis Media
    phonology
    Licensure
    Linguistics
    Research
    license
    Ear
    grant
    innovation
    linguistics
    ability
    Infection
    performance

    Bibliographical note

    This is an open access article
    This research was funded by a Nuffield Foundation Grant for Research and Innovation (reference EDU/40250). This project was funded by the Nuffield Foundation but the views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the Foundation.
    Published with license by Taylor & Francis
    Group, LLC© 2016 Helen L. Breadmore and
    Julia M. Carroll

    Cite this

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