Effects of Low Blood Alcohol Levels On Pilots’ Prioritization of Tasks During a Radio Navigation Task

Fiona J. Smith, Don Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Eight pilots flew a specified cross-country route using radio navigation in a flight simulator with simulated air traffic control. Four of the pilots flew with a low blood alcohol level (BAL; mean BAL = 20.63 mg%). Pilots’ performance was compared in terms of flying performance, navigation, and radio communication. We hypothesized that the tasks most likely to be shed as a result of alcohol impairment would be those lower down in the task prioritization hierarchy of “aviate, navigate and communicate”. This hypothesis was supported; alcohol was found to impair significantly pilots’ radio communication. Results are discussed with reference to the piloting task and the implications for alcohol regulation in aviation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)349-358
Number of pages10
JournalThe International Journal of Aviation Psychology
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Radio navigation
Radio
radio
Alcohols
Blood
alcohol
Dimercaprol
Aviation
Radio communication
Communication
Flight simulators
air traffic control
Air traffic control
communication
air traffic
flight
performance
Navigation
regulation
Blood Alcohol Content

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Applied Psychology
  • Education

Cite this

Effects of Low Blood Alcohol Levels On Pilots’ Prioritization of Tasks During a Radio Navigation Task. / Smith, Fiona J.; Harris, Don.

In: The International Journal of Aviation Psychology, Vol. 4, No. 4, 01.10.1994, p. 349-358.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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