Effects of exercise intensity on anticipation timing performance during a cycling task at moderate and vigorous intensities in children aged 7-11 years

Ruth Boat, Martyn Morris, Michael Duncan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined coincidence anticipation timing performance at moderate and fast stimulus speeds before, during, and after a 15 minute cycling task. In a within-subject design, 24 children (18 males and 6 females) exercised on a cycle ergometer under two experimental conditions: exercise intensities of 50% (moderate) and 75% (vigorous) heart rate reserve. Coincidence anticipation timing was measured using the Bassin Anticipation Timer at stimulus speeds of 5 and 8 mph. A 2 (intensity) × 3 (time) repeated measures ANOVA was conducted to evaluate the effect of exercise intensity on coincidence anticipation performance before, during, and immediately after the cycling task. Results indicated that for absolute error there was no significant main effect for time (p =.633) or experimental condition (p =.782) at the 5 mph stimulus speed. However, there was a significant interaction effect between experimental condition and time (p = 0.026) at the 5 mph stimulus speed. At the 8 mph stimulus speed, there was no significant main effect for time (p =.910) or condition (p =.938), or interaction effect between experimental condition and time (p =.591). Cycling exercise at moderate intensity appears to influence anticipation timing performance during and immediately after exercise in children, but only when stimulus speeds are moderate in nature.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)(In-press)
JournalEuropean Journal of Sport Science
Volume(In-press)
Early online date1 Aug 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 1 Aug 2019

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Exercise
Analysis of Variance
Heart Rate

Keywords

  • Cognitive performance
  • aerobic exercise
  • cycling performance
  • paediatric populations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Effects of exercise intensity on anticipation timing performance during a cycling task at moderate and vigorous intensities in children aged 7-11 years",
abstract = "This study examined coincidence anticipation timing performance at moderate and fast stimulus speeds before, during, and after a 15 minute cycling task. In a within-subject design, 24 children (18 males and 6 females) exercised on a cycle ergometer under two experimental conditions: exercise intensities of 50{\%} (moderate) and 75{\%} (vigorous) heart rate reserve. Coincidence anticipation timing was measured using the Bassin Anticipation Timer at stimulus speeds of 5 and 8 mph. A 2 (intensity) × 3 (time) repeated measures ANOVA was conducted to evaluate the effect of exercise intensity on coincidence anticipation performance before, during, and immediately after the cycling task. Results indicated that for absolute error there was no significant main effect for time (p =.633) or experimental condition (p =.782) at the 5 mph stimulus speed. However, there was a significant interaction effect between experimental condition and time (p = 0.026) at the 5 mph stimulus speed. At the 8 mph stimulus speed, there was no significant main effect for time (p =.910) or condition (p =.938), or interaction effect between experimental condition and time (p =.591). Cycling exercise at moderate intensity appears to influence anticipation timing performance during and immediately after exercise in children, but only when stimulus speeds are moderate in nature.",
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