Effects of different training intensities in high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on maximal aerobic velocity, hematological and muscle-damage markers in healthy young adults

Fatma Rhibi, Abderraouf Ben Abderrahman, Jacques Prioux, Cain C. T. Clark, Benoît Bideau, Sophia Besbes, Anthony C. Hackney, Urs Granacher, Hassane Zouhal

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    Abstract

    Abstract: This study aimed to examine the effects of two high-intensity interval training programs (HIIT) on maximal aerobic velocity (MAV), hematological variations and muscle damage markers in young healthy adults. Twenty-nine male physical education students, aged 20.3 ± 3.3 years, volunteered to participate in this study, and were randomly assigned to a control group (CG, n = 9) or two intervention groups (group 1 or 2). Intervention group 1 (n = 10) exercised at 100% of their MAV (EG100) while group 2 (n = 10) exercised at 110% MAV (EG110). Before and after the eight week training program, blood samples were drawn at rest, before, and after an intermittent exercise. Aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT), alanine aminotransferase (ALAT), C reactive protein (CRP), creatine kinase (CK) concentrations and hematological parameters (white blood cells [WBC], monocytes [MO], lymphocytes [LY], neutrophil [NE]) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were measured. Post-hoc tests showed that MAV was significantly higher in EG110 compared to EG100 after HIIT (p < 0.01, ηp2 = 0.05), whilst ALAT, ASAT, and CPR were significantly lower (p < 0.01; 0.02 < ηp2 < 0.11) in EG110 compared to EG100. Moreover, post-hoc tests indicated that LY decreased significantly (p < 0.001, ηp2 = 0.21) only for EG110. Furthermore, there were significant positive correlations for both EG100 and EG110 between MAV and ALAT (r = 0.66, p = 0.044 and r = 0.64, p = 0.041 respectively), CK (r = 0.67, p = 0.031 and r = 0.86, p = 0.030, respectively), LDH (r = 0.74, p = 0.014, and r = 0.071, p = 0.021, respectively). In addition, there was a significant positive correlation for both, EG100 and EG110 between MAV and LY (r = 0.79, p < 0.01; r = 0.72, p < 0.05, respectively). Concerning the relationship between MAV and NE, there was a significant positive correlation (r = 0.66; p < 0.05) only for EG110. Findings from this study revealed that HIIT at 110% MAV was more efficient to improve MAV and reduce muscle damage. In addition, we observed significant associations between performance improvements (MAV) and markers of muscle damage.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article number158
    Number of pages12
    JournalBMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
    Volume14
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 22 Aug 2022

    Bibliographical note

    Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.

    Keywords

    • Research
    • Performances
    • Immunological parameters
    • Intermittent exercise
    • Hematological parameters

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