Effects of cooling before and during simulated match play on thermoregulatory responses of athletes with tetraplegia

K.E. Griggs, G. Havenith, T. Paulson, Mike Price, V.L. Goosey-Tolfrey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives Athletes with high level spinal cord injuries (tetraplegia) are under greater thermal strain during exercise than the able-bodied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of pre-cooling using an ice vest and the combination of pre-cooling and cooling during play using water sprays in athletes with tetraplegia. Design Counter-balanced, cross-over design. Methods Eight wheelchair rugby players with tetraplegia completed a 60 min intermittent sprint protocol (ISP) on a wheelchair ergometer in 20.2 °C ± 0.2 °C and 33.0% ± 3.1% relative humidity. The ISP was conducted on three occasions; no cooling (NC), pre-cooling with an ice vest (P) and pre-cooling with an ice vest and water sprays between quarters (PW). Gastrointestinal (Tgi) temperature, mean skin temperature (Tsk) and perceptual responses were measured throughout. Results At the end of pre-cooling, the change in Tgi was not significantly different between conditions (P > 0.05) but the change in Tsk was significantly greater in P and PW compared to NC (P < 0.001). The change in Tgi over the ISP was significantly lower in PW and P compared to NC (P < 0.05), whilst the change in Tsk was lower in PW compared to P and NC (P < 0.05). Cooling had no effect on performance or perceptual responses (P > 0.05). Conclusions Water spraying between quarters combined with pre-cooling using an ice vest lowers thermal strain to a greater degree than pre-cooling only in athletes with tetraplegia, but has no effect on simulated wheelchair rugby performance or perceptual responses.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)819-824
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Volume9
Early online date21 Mar 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2017

Fingerprint

Quadriplegia
Ice
Athletes
Wheelchairs
Football
Hot Temperature
Skin Temperature
Water
Humidity
Spinal Cord Injuries
Cross-Over Studies
Exercise
Temperature
Cool-X-A

Keywords

  • Spinal cord injuries
  • Sports for persons with disabilities
  • Body temperature regulation
  • Exercise physiology
  • Water sprays
  • Ice vest

Cite this

Effects of cooling before and during simulated match play on thermoregulatory responses of athletes with tetraplegia. / Griggs, K.E.; Havenith, G.; Paulson, T.; Price, Mike; Goosey-Tolfrey, V.L.

In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Vol. 9, 09.2017, p. 819-824.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Effects of cooling before and during simulated match play on thermoregulatory responses of athletes with tetraplegia",
abstract = "Objectives Athletes with high level spinal cord injuries (tetraplegia) are under greater thermal strain during exercise than the able-bodied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of pre-cooling using an ice vest and the combination of pre-cooling and cooling during play using water sprays in athletes with tetraplegia. Design Counter-balanced, cross-over design. Methods Eight wheelchair rugby players with tetraplegia completed a 60 min intermittent sprint protocol (ISP) on a wheelchair ergometer in 20.2 °C ± 0.2 °C and 33.0{\%} ± 3.1{\%} relative humidity. The ISP was conducted on three occasions; no cooling (NC), pre-cooling with an ice vest (P) and pre-cooling with an ice vest and water sprays between quarters (PW). Gastrointestinal (Tgi) temperature, mean skin temperature (Tsk) and perceptual responses were measured throughout. Results At the end of pre-cooling, the change in Tgi was not significantly different between conditions (P > 0.05) but the change in Tsk was significantly greater in P and PW compared to NC (P < 0.001). The change in Tgi over the ISP was significantly lower in PW and P compared to NC (P < 0.05), whilst the change in Tsk was lower in PW compared to P and NC (P < 0.05). Cooling had no effect on performance or perceptual responses (P > 0.05). Conclusions Water spraying between quarters combined with pre-cooling using an ice vest lowers thermal strain to a greater degree than pre-cooling only in athletes with tetraplegia, but has no effect on simulated wheelchair rugby performance or perceptual responses.",
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N2 - Objectives Athletes with high level spinal cord injuries (tetraplegia) are under greater thermal strain during exercise than the able-bodied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of pre-cooling using an ice vest and the combination of pre-cooling and cooling during play using water sprays in athletes with tetraplegia. Design Counter-balanced, cross-over design. Methods Eight wheelchair rugby players with tetraplegia completed a 60 min intermittent sprint protocol (ISP) on a wheelchair ergometer in 20.2 °C ± 0.2 °C and 33.0% ± 3.1% relative humidity. The ISP was conducted on three occasions; no cooling (NC), pre-cooling with an ice vest (P) and pre-cooling with an ice vest and water sprays between quarters (PW). Gastrointestinal (Tgi) temperature, mean skin temperature (Tsk) and perceptual responses were measured throughout. Results At the end of pre-cooling, the change in Tgi was not significantly different between conditions (P > 0.05) but the change in Tsk was significantly greater in P and PW compared to NC (P < 0.001). The change in Tgi over the ISP was significantly lower in PW and P compared to NC (P < 0.05), whilst the change in Tsk was lower in PW compared to P and NC (P < 0.05). Cooling had no effect on performance or perceptual responses (P > 0.05). Conclusions Water spraying between quarters combined with pre-cooling using an ice vest lowers thermal strain to a greater degree than pre-cooling only in athletes with tetraplegia, but has no effect on simulated wheelchair rugby performance or perceptual responses.

AB - Objectives Athletes with high level spinal cord injuries (tetraplegia) are under greater thermal strain during exercise than the able-bodied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of pre-cooling using an ice vest and the combination of pre-cooling and cooling during play using water sprays in athletes with tetraplegia. Design Counter-balanced, cross-over design. Methods Eight wheelchair rugby players with tetraplegia completed a 60 min intermittent sprint protocol (ISP) on a wheelchair ergometer in 20.2 °C ± 0.2 °C and 33.0% ± 3.1% relative humidity. The ISP was conducted on three occasions; no cooling (NC), pre-cooling with an ice vest (P) and pre-cooling with an ice vest and water sprays between quarters (PW). Gastrointestinal (Tgi) temperature, mean skin temperature (Tsk) and perceptual responses were measured throughout. Results At the end of pre-cooling, the change in Tgi was not significantly different between conditions (P > 0.05) but the change in Tsk was significantly greater in P and PW compared to NC (P < 0.001). The change in Tgi over the ISP was significantly lower in PW and P compared to NC (P < 0.05), whilst the change in Tsk was lower in PW compared to P and NC (P < 0.05). Cooling had no effect on performance or perceptual responses (P > 0.05). Conclusions Water spraying between quarters combined with pre-cooling using an ice vest lowers thermal strain to a greater degree than pre-cooling only in athletes with tetraplegia, but has no effect on simulated wheelchair rugby performance or perceptual responses.

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KW - Sports for persons with disabilities

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