Effects of a self-managed home-based walking intervention on psychosocial health outcomes for breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy: a randomised controlled trial

Kajal Gokal, Deborah Wallis, Samreen Ahmed, Ion Boiangiu, Kiran Kancherala, Fehmidah Munir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Purpose
This study evaluated the effectiveness of a self-managed home-based moderate intensity walking intervention on psychosocial health outcomes among breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

Methods
The randomised controlled trial compared a self-managed, home-based walking intervention to usual care alone among breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Outcome measures included changes in self-report measures of anxiety, depression, fatigue, self-esteem, mood and physical activity. Fifty participants were randomised to either the intervention group (n = 25), who received 12 weeks of moderate intensity walking, or the control group (n = 25) mid-way through chemotherapy. Participants in the intervention group were provided with a pedometer and were asked to set goals and keep weekly diaries outlining the duration, intensity and exertion of their walking. Levels of psychosocial functioning and physical activity were assessed pre- and post-intervention in both groups.

Results
The intervention had positive effects on fatigue (F = 5.77, p = 0.02), self-esteem (F = 8.93, p ≤ 0.001), mood (F = 4.73, p = 0.03) and levels of physical activity (x2 = 17.15, p = 0.0011) but not anxiety (F = 0.90, p = 0.35) and depression (F = 0.26, p = 0.60) as assessed using the HADS. We found an 80 % adherence rate to completing the 12-week intervention and recording weekly logs.

Conclusion
This self-managed, home-based intervention was beneficial for improving psychosocial well-being and levels of physical activity among breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1139-1166
JournalSupportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
Volume24
Issue number3
Early online date15 Aug 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Walking
Randomized Controlled Trials
Exercise
Breast Neoplasms
Drug Therapy
Health
Self Concept
Fatigue
Anxiety
Depression
Self Report
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Control Groups

Bibliographical note

The final publication is available at Springer via
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-015-2884-5

Cite this

Effects of a self-managed home-based walking intervention on psychosocial health outcomes for breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy: a randomised controlled trial. / Gokal, Kajal; Wallis, Deborah ; Ahmed, Samreen; Boiangiu, Ion; Kancherala, Kiran; Munir, Fehmidah .

In: Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, Vol. 24, No. 3, 03.2016, p. 1139-1166.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Boiangiu, Ion

AU - Kancherala, Kiran

AU - Munir, Fehmidah

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N2 - PurposeThis study evaluated the effectiveness of a self-managed home-based moderate intensity walking intervention on psychosocial health outcomes among breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.MethodsThe randomised controlled trial compared a self-managed, home-based walking intervention to usual care alone among breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Outcome measures included changes in self-report measures of anxiety, depression, fatigue, self-esteem, mood and physical activity. Fifty participants were randomised to either the intervention group (n = 25), who received 12 weeks of moderate intensity walking, or the control group (n = 25) mid-way through chemotherapy. Participants in the intervention group were provided with a pedometer and were asked to set goals and keep weekly diaries outlining the duration, intensity and exertion of their walking. Levels of psychosocial functioning and physical activity were assessed pre- and post-intervention in both groups.ResultsThe intervention had positive effects on fatigue (F = 5.77, p = 0.02), self-esteem (F = 8.93, p ≤ 0.001), mood (F = 4.73, p = 0.03) and levels of physical activity (x2 = 17.15, p = 0.0011) but not anxiety (F = 0.90, p = 0.35) and depression (F = 0.26, p = 0.60) as assessed using the HADS. We found an 80 % adherence rate to completing the 12-week intervention and recording weekly logs.ConclusionThis self-managed, home-based intervention was beneficial for improving psychosocial well-being and levels of physical activity among breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.

AB - PurposeThis study evaluated the effectiveness of a self-managed home-based moderate intensity walking intervention on psychosocial health outcomes among breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.MethodsThe randomised controlled trial compared a self-managed, home-based walking intervention to usual care alone among breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Outcome measures included changes in self-report measures of anxiety, depression, fatigue, self-esteem, mood and physical activity. Fifty participants were randomised to either the intervention group (n = 25), who received 12 weeks of moderate intensity walking, or the control group (n = 25) mid-way through chemotherapy. Participants in the intervention group were provided with a pedometer and were asked to set goals and keep weekly diaries outlining the duration, intensity and exertion of their walking. Levels of psychosocial functioning and physical activity were assessed pre- and post-intervention in both groups.ResultsThe intervention had positive effects on fatigue (F = 5.77, p = 0.02), self-esteem (F = 8.93, p ≤ 0.001), mood (F = 4.73, p = 0.03) and levels of physical activity (x2 = 17.15, p = 0.0011) but not anxiety (F = 0.90, p = 0.35) and depression (F = 0.26, p = 0.60) as assessed using the HADS. We found an 80 % adherence rate to completing the 12-week intervention and recording weekly logs.ConclusionThis self-managed, home-based intervention was beneficial for improving psychosocial well-being and levels of physical activity among breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.

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