Effect of micro- to nanosize inclusions upon the thermal conductivity of powdered composites with high and low interface resistance

Muhammad Zain-ul-abdein, W.S. Awan, Hassan Ijaz, Aqeel Ahmad Taimoor, Ayyaz Muhammad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Materials for thermal management application require better control over the thermophysical properties, which has largely been achieved by fabricating powdered composite. There are, however, several factors like filler volume fraction, shape morphology, inclusion size, and interfacial thermal resistance that limit the effective properties of the medium. This paper presents a methodology to estimate the effective thermal conductivity of powdered composites where the filler material is more conductive than the matrix. Only a few theoretical models, such as Hasselman and Johnson (HJ) model, include the effect of interfacial resistance in their formulation. Nevertheless, HJ model does not specify the nature of the interfacial thermal resistance. Although Sevostianov and Kachanov (SK) method takes care of interface thickness, they, on the other hand, have not taken into account the interfacial resistance due to atomic imperfections. In the present work, HJ model has been modified using SK method and the results were compared with experimental ones from the literature. It has been found that the effect of interfacial resistance is significant in highly resistive medium at microscale compared to nanoscale, such as Cu/diamond system, while, in a highly conductive medium, like bakelite/graphite system, the effect of shape factor is more significant than interfacial thermal resistance.
Original languageEnglish
Article number843914
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Nanomaterials
Volume2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Oct 2015
Externally publishedYes

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