Effect of grinding on early age performance of High Volume Fly Ash ternary blended pastes with CKD & OPC

D. Bondar, Eoin Coakley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)
33 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This study investigated setting times and early age compressive strength of the high volume fly ash (HVFA) blended pastes prepared with ground materials. The pastes consisted of 60% Fly Ash + 30% Portland cement (CEM I) + 10% cement kiln dust (CKD) and tests were carried out for four different fly ashes. In phase 1, all the constituent binder materials (class F-fly ash, CEMI and CKD) were initially mixed in the relevant proportions and were ground for varying time periods (1, 2 and 4 hours). In phase 2, the CEM I and CKD were mixed and ground for different time periods (1 and 2 hours) and then added to the unground fly ash. Both wrapped and submerged curing were used for compressive strength test samples. Overall, grinding of constituents appeared to be largely ineffective at increasing 2 day compressive strength although strength enhancements at 28 days were generally observed. Paste samples that were made from interground constituents generally achieved higher 28 day strengths than corresponding pastes where only the activators were ground, although this was not consistent throughout so further investigation is suggested in this area. Submerged curing is generally less effective in increasing compressive strength than wrapped curing as leaching of CKD is suspected to have occurred.

Publisher Statement: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Construction and Building Materials. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Construction and Building Materials, [136, (2017)] DOI: 10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2017.01.044

© 2017, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)153-163
JournalConstruction and Building Materials
Volume136
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2017

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Coal Ash
Kilns
Ointments
Fly ash
Dust
Cements
Compressive strength
Curing
Portland cement
Leaching
Binders
Quality control

Bibliographical note

NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Construction and Building Materials. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Construction and Building Materials, [136, (2017)] DOI: 10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2017.01.044

© 2017, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Keywords

  • CKD
  • intergrinding
  • separate grinding
  • particle size distribution (PSD)
  • HVFA ternary pastes

Cite this

Effect of grinding on early age performance of High Volume Fly Ash ternary blended pastes with CKD & OPC. / Bondar, D.; Coakley, Eoin.

In: Construction and Building Materials, Vol. 136, 01.04.2017, p. 153-163.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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